Definition of injustice in English:

injustice

noun

mass noun
  • 1Lack of fairness or justice.

    ‘she was taken aback by the injustice of Nora's remark’
    • ‘The sentiment of the film is that it is time for injustice and impunity to end.’
    • ‘The passivity involved here is that of letting oneself be affected by all that is negative, by injustice and death.’
    • ‘This is fundamental to medicine and healing; it applies no less to social injustice.’
    • ‘We must tackle ignorance, poverty and injustice but we must do so on contemporary battlefields.’
    • ‘Poverty and injustice are recognised as factors that nurture terrorism.’
    • ‘Terrorism, he said, could only be defeated by addressing global problems of poverty and injustice.’
    • ‘The campaign calls on the Brazilian people to overcome all violence and injustice.’
    • ‘It is hard to imagine the horrors of war, crippling poverty or injustice where we live.’
    • ‘So I grew up in a home that made me very sensitive to racism, to unfairness, to injustice.’
    • ‘The fight against social and political injustice has historically been an integral part of Sikhism.’
    • ‘This is the Irish premier of this play which deals with justice and social injustice.’
    • ‘Pressure groups have always played a vital part in ending discrimination and injustice.’
    • ‘Terrorism and lawlessness thrive where poverty and despair are met with injustice.’
    • ‘There is a growing consciousness both amongst the elite and those that face injustice.’
    • ‘How can some of that emotion be channelled to indignation about poverty and social injustice here too?’
    • ‘The cost of strict liability is that it may result in injustice in individual cases.’
    • ‘To claim to do so in the name of ‘true justice’ is simply insulting to the victims of injustice.’
    • ‘So the greatest injustice our manifesto addresses is the unfairness to a child born into poverty.’
    • ‘Open letters appeared at key moments in the history of injustice in this country.’
    • ‘Economic privilege and injustice is increasing and class prejudice is accepted to an alarming degree.’
    1. 1.1count noun An unjust act or occurrence.
      ‘brooding over life's injustices’
      • ‘Some land surrendered to the Crown may have involved injustices.’
      • ‘It was literature that gave her the courage to write about the terrible injustices she witnessed among the black population.’
      • ‘He referred to a number of grave injustices that were imposed on non-national workers in this country.’
      • ‘But the Vietnam he founded is not one that wallows in the injustices and hardships of the past.’
      • ‘However, social and racial injustices persist and it's important that some people should get angry about it.’
      • ‘But in spite of the injustices meted out by her father, she is not bitter.’
      • ‘Put this injustice right Home Office, these men have earned the right to be called British and they are proud to do so.’
      • ‘Do they campaign against the assorted injustices in the city and challenge politicians on their doorstep?’
      • ‘They revel in every perceived injustice, and are desperate to have someone to blame.’
      • ‘Putting a deadline on eliminating this injustice would be a real success.’
      • ‘They fought shoulder-to-shoulder with men against the injustices of colonial rule.’
      • ‘On behalf of the people that I represent in this parliament, I say sorry for these past injustices.’
      • ‘However, in our quest for universal peace, this does not mean that we are forgetful of injustices.’
      • ‘You are downplaying the honest feelings we have in regards to these injustices, and losing our respect.’
      • ‘It should aim to make us aware of the injustices still rampant.’
      • ‘We all see how global injustices directly affect local injustices.’
      • ‘This must be reversed, otherwise this country will collapse when such injustices remain.’
      • ‘We need to take the opportunities we have to be active, not passive, in exposing the injustices done to ourselves and to others.’
      • ‘Few people in his position used their fame to stand up against injustices and to spread the message of love and peace in the way he did.’
      • ‘Australia provides for and nurtures this injustice by its immoral foreign policy.’
      unfairness, unjustness, inequity, corruption
      wrong, injury, offence, unjust act, evil, villainy, crime, sin, iniquity, misdeed, outrage, atrocity, scandal, disgrace, monstrosity, affront, grievance
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • do someone an injustice

    • Judge a person unfairly.

      ‘I see I had been doing you an injustice’
      • ‘While he was in no way bound to Rebecca, he felt as though he was doing her an injustice by spending the evening with another girl.’
      • ‘Perhaps I'm doing him an injustice in assuming that he was preening.’
      • ‘Pearson tells us he was handsome, so maybe the photographs reproduced here do him an injustice.’
      • ‘He does me an injustice as I have no problems with the airport as such.’
      • ‘I have been disturbed by the superior and patronising tone adopted by some of your correspondents to the involvement of young people in the anti-war movement - they do them an injustice.’
      get the wrong idea about, get wrong, get the wrong end of the stick about, judge incorrectly, jump to the wrong conclusion about, estimate wrongly
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin injustitia, from in- ‘not’ + justus ‘just, right’.

Pronunciation

injustice

/ɪnˈdʒʌstɪs/