Definition of inhumation in English:

inhumation

noun

Archaeology
  • 1[mass noun] The action or practice of burying the dead; the fact of being buried:

    ‘cremation took over from inhumation as the dominant burial rite’
    • ‘Also from the north came the use of cremation instead of inhumation, around 1200 BC.’
    • ‘In late Roman times there was an increased diversity in burial practice and examples of both cremation and inhumation are found.’
    • ‘As part of a new study of the Early Iron Age burials in the area of the Classical Agora, all of the human remains from the cremation and inhumation burials that were kept are being re-examined.’
    • ‘The trend from cremation to inhumation in burial practice may also be consciously copying the changing Roman fashion.’
    • ‘They were looking at the first complete cemetery of individual Viking inhumation graves ever excavated in England.’
    1. 1.1[count noun] A burial or buried corpse:
      ‘more than thirty human inhumations from various sites’
      • ‘The 5th - 7th century cemetery at Lakenheath in Suffolk contained, in all, 437 burials (420 inhumations and 17 cremations), including 65 found this year.’
      • ‘Four animal bones were directly associated with the inhumation.’
      • ‘They are almost all from early Bronze Age funerary contexts, mostly crouched inhumations; and where the sex of the deceased has been determined, it has been female in virtually every case.’
      • ‘It was just fantastic to find this skeleton, an extended inhumation in this small area, which was well preserved, with personal grave goods, and radiocarbon dated to 5,500 years ago.’
      • ‘The most outstanding was in Barrow 1, a male inhumation accompanied by many artefacts, some of them from remote sources.’
      burial, burying, interment, committal, entombment, laying to rest, consignment to the grave
      corpse, body, dead body, cadaver, carcass, skeleton
      View synonyms

Pronunciation:

inhumation

/ˌɪnhjʊˈmeɪʃ(ə)n/