Definition of infuriating in English:

infuriating

adjective

  • Making one extremely angry and impatient.

    ‘that infuriating half-smile on his face’
    • ‘This argument that bad doctors are responsible for the medical malpractice crisis is the most infuriating argument out there.’
    • ‘In any case, dealing with life on a bad team can be infuriating.’
    • ‘I refer to the infuriating trend for some organisations to simply ignore the email they receive.’
    • ‘Elizabeth found the question, voiced so mildly, infuriating.’
    • ‘It goes to the heart of this very peculiar product, which at one and the same time is both endearing and infuriating.’
    • ‘The battle for power has moved into the shadows, casting an infuriating fog over its news coverage.’
    • ‘His inability to see her side of this was infuriating.’
    • ‘The use of marriage as a wedge issue by this administration is both infuriating and insulting to me.’
    • ‘The problem is that it is as infuriating as it is inspiring.’
    • ‘This time his team chose the big city to produce their most infuriating performance of the season.’
    • ‘The infuriating part of all this is that the world is so helpless in such situations.’
    • ‘What's infuriating about the photography ban is not just how stupid it is, but how wrong it is, too.’
    • ‘Such uncertainty, though infuriating, is apt.’
    • ‘While inevitably self-indulgent and infuriating in parts, it is also smart and surprising.’
    • ‘Millions of kids, through the book, feel the infuriating injustices of autocracy.’
    • ‘His collections are by turns brilliant, challenging, infuriating - and totally unwearable.’
    • ‘The whole area of politics and campaigning is infuriating at times.’
    • ‘To actually go and try to find it can be infuriating and virtually impossible.’
    • ‘On the other hand, this game can be absolutely infuriating.’
    • ‘That suspicion has been inflamed by infuriating inconsistency.’

Pronunciation:

infuriating

/ɪnˈfjʊərɪeɪtɪŋ/