Definition of infelicitous in English:

infelicitous

adjective

  • Unfortunate; inappropriate:

    ‘his illustration is singularly infelicitous’
    • ‘‘I think we need ‘Insensitivity Training’ to equip people to get through life without freaking out every time somebody opens their mouth and says something slightly infelicitous.’’
    • ‘It was a smart neologism, I suppose, even if a bit infelicitous.’
    • ‘On top of his last Parliamentary committee appearance, where among other infelicitous comments, Griffin said that he didn't understand his organisation's budget, he has since dropped a clanger on his relationship with the Government.’
    • ‘Given the infelicitous effects of other utterances in the play, Titus's vow during this extended ritual does not act as directly or causatively as he thinks it does.’
    • ‘The four disciplines of aquatic sports, namely swimming, water polo, diving and synchronized swimming are infelicitous and poorly represented.’
    • ‘This is… infelicitous at best, worrisomely revealing at worst.’
    • ‘I can sort of see my way through, but I have trouble explaining why the following is infelicitous.’
    • ‘Thus, AngloSaxon corporatism was constrained in two important ways: by an infelicitous social setting and by unresponsive, even antagonistic, state institutions.’
    • ‘Additionally, they didn't view their admittedly infelicitous subject matter as somehow requiring a huskier or aggressive musical stance.’
    • ‘This infelicitous parental combination had produced a timid, nervous son whose prognosis for healthy adulthood was poor.’
    • ‘And Reeve nails the problem with market-led concepts of desert only to adumbrate an alternative that is equally infelicitous.’
    • ‘Somewhat infelicitous and arrhythmic on paper, the pledge is powerful when chanted out loud by thousands.’
    • ‘Finally, do not feel unfortunate or infelicitous.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, the party's support is up, and there are elections on the way, which is a not infelicitous situation for any political leader to be in.’
    • ‘It accounts for the occasional lapses into infelicitous sentiment, tired phrasing and intrusive personal details that would have appalled the American.’
    • ‘In the end, few if any Egyptians were convinced of the chief French proclamation which announced, in infelicitous Arabic style, that they had come to liberate them by the sword.’
    • ‘But if literary language is performative and if a performative utterance is not true or false but felicitous or infelicitous, what does it mean for a literary utterance to be felicitous or infelicitous?’
    • ‘Second, the Employment Tribunal's decision should be read generously and not overturned merely because of infelicitous or inappropriate statements which were looking at the matter in the round, of an inessential nature.’
    • ‘I have no real doubt that, despite the infelicitous wording of the passage relied on by the claimants, the committee would have understood the report in the way I have indicated.’
    • ‘Every scholar and teacher has a list of infelicitous translations which misrepresent or distort the meaning intended by biblical authors.’
    unfortunate, regrettable, unsuitable, inappropriate, inapposite, inapt, inadvisable, injudicious, untimely, inopportune
    imprudent, incautious, indiscreet, indelicate, tactless, insensitive
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

infelicitous

/ɪnfɪˈlɪsɪtəs/