Definition of infamously in English:

infamously

adverb

  • In a way that is well known for some bad quality or deed.

    ‘he infamously remarked that he hadn't read the Treaty’
    • ‘In 1895, Booker T. Washington infamously counseled accommodation to racial discrimination in exchange for material progress that never materialized.’
    • ‘The popes of the later 15th century behaved like temporal princes, notoriously political and infamously corrupt.’
    • ‘In 1949, the first Bollingen Prize went somewhat infamously to Ezra Pound.’
    • ‘He infamously demanded that a curtain be erected in a justice department building to cover two statues.’
    • ‘In one of his more whimsical works, Sock, he attached a man's white sock to a canvas, a theme to which he would infamously return in 1992.’
    • ‘His crowd was infamously brutal, especially to the weaker of their own kind.’
    • ‘We have adopted the model somewhat infamously described in Animal Farm where all animals are equal but some are more equal than others.’
    • ‘Shakespeare's stage—that infamously barren, wooden O—was perhaps a bit more cluttered than previously thought.’
    • ‘For the architect, establishing a relationship with the backyard mitigates the ranch's infamously low ceilings.’
    • ‘In the 1990s, the ports infamously dumped inner-harbor dredgings in a popular fishing spot near the islands.’

Pronunciation

infamously

/ˈɪnfəməsli/