Definition of inebriate in English:

inebriate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
Pronunciation /ɪˈniːbrɪeɪt/
often as adjective inebriated
humorous, formal
  • Make (someone) drunk; intoxicate.

    ‘I got mildly inebriated’
    • ‘I was inebriated and thought they were really cool, but they had gone out of fashion before they'd even left the shop.’
    • ‘The mud underfoot is fast becoming a river and various members of the crew are skidding and staggering across the car park, like inebriated Bambis.’
    • ‘Two foreign tours later, my garden had become a cider-pond, surrounded by staggering inebriated wasps.’
    • ‘So exuberant, perhaps a tad inebriated but almost always good natured and fun.’
    • ‘I banged on the door, too inebriated and stupefied to think.’
    • ‘Become inebriated, do not fight it, revel in the sheer joy of unmitigated excess and alcohol induced stupidity.’
    • ‘Of the most memorable, ecstatic and monumentally fun moments so far, many have happened while inebriated.’
    • ‘At least my old friends didn't find me inebriated on the floor of a bar.’
    • ‘After he said a few things and we looked at how he was acting we realized he was inebriated.’
    • ‘The Garda witness said the victim was quite inebriated when he saw her later and she had to be helped into a Garda car.’
    • ‘As I get increasingly inebriated, I make friends to stumble from bar to bar with.’
    • ‘Children are resorting to binge drinking, often becoming so inebriated they can't speak or walk.’
    • ‘I asked her how long it had taken her to get her sea legs, but she said she'd been rather inebriated.’
    • ‘The smell of alcohol and sweat poured from the doorway and they stepped back as two inebriated guys stumbled past them.’
    • ‘Other positives include the convenience of not getting inebriated.’
    • ‘Even though I was, unsurprisingly, inebriated, and just wanted to lark and josh around with the lads.’
    • ‘The old man was not inebriated or hurt by a passing vehicle.’
    • ‘Several of the more inebriated patrons were dancing, whether it was on the tables, chairs or floor.’
    • ‘We were two slightly inebriated gentlemen trundling along on a Sunday evening.’
    • ‘This allowed for an extremely inebriated guy to take the stage.’
    drunk, intoxicated, inebriate, drunken, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence
    View synonyms

noun

Pronunciation /ɪˈniːbrɪət/
humorous, formal
  • A drunkard.

    ‘he was marked down as an inebriate’
    • ‘Then, with all the strength she possessed, she threw the inebriate onto her shoulders as if he was nothing more than a mink stole.’
    • ‘After all, self-discipline was to be the dominant trait of both the proper slave master and the reformed inebriate.’
    • ‘From 12 March 1915 ‘sixteen male inebriates of the non-criminal type’ were sent to Shaftesbury from the State Penitentiary for a period of re-habitation.’
    • ‘The casual drinkers stumbled out to be replaced by the more sinister silent sort of inebriate - the kind with cold, mad eyes.’
    • ‘In 1913 the London County Council carried a resolution to close its inebriate reformatory, Farmfield.’
    • ‘Philostratus in turn described Andros as a land of Cockaigne for inebriates.’
    • ‘Anchorage used to have an honor farm where inebriates grew their own food and fished.’
    • ‘He is an habitual inebriate but not an habitual drunkard.’
    • ‘It was more like a soccer match attended by a club of misanthropic inebriates.’
    • ‘Alcohol abuse has in many instances also reduced once dignified, principled and balanced people into inferior inebriates lacking drive, initiative and resoluteness.’
    • ‘In this age of industrial capitalism, the goal was to restore inebriates' economic productivity as well as their willpower.’
    • ‘As for reducing the number of public inebriates, the answer is simple: Do not let them drink.’
    • ‘The tree trunk has become a useful crutch for the inebriate.’
    • ‘Homeless chronic inebriates require access to transitional housing and supportive services in order to stabilize.’
    • ‘Public interest in medical treatment for inebriates waxed when local prohibition laws and sentiment waned.’
    • ‘The Magistrates, believing that imprisonment would not reform the woman, decided to send her to an inebriates' home for two years.’
    drinker, heavy drinker, problem drinker, drunk, drunkard, alcoholic, dipsomaniac, alcohol-abuser, alcohol addict, person with a drink problem
    View synonyms

adjective

Pronunciation /ɪˈniːbrɪət/
humorous, formal
  • Drunk; intoxicated.

    ‘he had been known to get hopelessly inebriate’
    ‘inebriate times by the Bay’
    • ‘We hooked up with the wedding party towards the inebriate end of the evening - my word, did we ever.’
    • ‘They are political or philosophical, merrily inebriate or sententiously sober.’
    • ‘Prominent candidates are denounced as renegade and inebriate.’
    • ‘Thoroughly fed up with the whole affair, I cut my losses and my inebriate courage disappeared.’
    • ‘The hitherto silent island of Naxos has startlingly become populated with fauns and maenads and sileni and old Silenus himself swaying inebriate on his donkey.’
    • ‘To that end, if anyone wants an inebriate Santa staying on their floor sometime in December, do let me know.’
    • ‘Moreover, it can give one a feeling of energy, power and strength that can last for days after the inebriate effects have worn off.’
    • ‘An inebriate Glaswegian was ahead of me in the queue.’
    drunk, intoxicated, inebriate, drunken, tipsy, the worse for drink, under the influence
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (as an adjective): from Latin inebriatus, past participle of inebriare ‘intoxicate’ (based on ebrius ‘drunk’).

Pronunciation

inebriate

Verb/ɪˈniːbrɪeɪt/

inebriate

Noun/ɪˈniːbrɪət/

inebriate

Adjective/ɪˈniːbrɪət/