Definition of inducement in English:

inducement

noun

  • 1A thing that persuades or leads someone to do something.

    ‘companies were prepared to build only in return for massive inducements’
    [mass noun], [with infinitive] [with infinitive] ‘there is no inducement to wait for payment’
    • ‘The Bill's benefits package is no longer a reward for service rendered but an inducement to serve and has become a significant part of recruiters' pitches.’
    • ‘We induced them under pressure, and inducements, to send their money into New York, into the New York financial system; so they built up the system.’
    • ‘Whether such tax credits are sufficient inducement to donors remains to be established.’
    • ‘The ordinary meaning of ‘incitement’ as adopted in the authorities is that it encompasses encouragement, persuasion or inducement.’
    • ‘The pressures and inducements to respond are enormous.’
    • ‘There was no inducement to lead a good life because evil people would spend their eternity in Hell.’
    • ‘However, luckily for May, it seems possible profit was inducement enough to persuade them to open the door.’
    • ‘They assess the efficiency of various forms of coercion as well as inducements.’
    • ‘Stimulation is taken to mean an inducement, a spur to action, an interest in doing something.’
    • ‘However, positive inducements and reassurances must be credible and truly attractive.’
    • ‘In effect these new finances represent the inducement required to persuade developing countries to conserve their genetic resources.’
    • ‘Hypnosis involves inducement of a trance - a condition between waking and sleeping.’
    • ‘Book sales reps commonly use any of three inducements to convince bookstores to carry specific titles.’
    • ‘Even so, remuneration for military service did provide inducement early on.’
    • ‘Undue inducement, coercion, selection bias towards the poor, and distortion of the doctor-patient relationship are cited by critics of financial incentives.’
    • ‘We don't need much inducement to eat, wash, beautify ourselves, or gratify our needs, but for many of us, honoring other people doesn't come easily.’
    • ‘I am quite satisfied that she is refusing to give evidence and that no inducements or protection which the court could afford would persuade her otherwise.’
    • ‘They have several inducements to seek legal advice, and these inducements have been strengthened in recent years.’
    • ‘It's a discovery likely to add new weight to parental inducements to ‘eat more greens ‘…’
    • ‘Just as important as mechanisms to ensure productivity were inducements to encourage men to work harder.’
    incentive, attraction, encouragement, temptation, incitement, stimulation, stimulus, bait, lure, pull, draw, spur, goad, impetus, motive, motivation, provocation
    bribe, reward
    carrot, come-on, sweetener, perk
    douceur
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A bribe.
      ‘it is claimed that she was offered an inducement to plead guilty’
      • ‘They don't even have to pretend they like it if they don't; there is no big monetary inducement involved.’
      • ‘We will not put any conditions, bribe or inducement to show up at this working group meeting.’
      • ‘And you know that he can be motivated by money or other inducements - which means that you start out discounting whatever he's about to tell you.’
      • ‘But Crikey's sources also say there's still the odd dodgy inducement here and there.’
      • ‘They accused evangelical Christians of bribing the poor by offering them inducements to convert.’
      • ‘My dictionary defines a bribe as ‘Money or other inducement offered to procure action in favour of the giver’, so bribe it is.’
      • ‘I feel massively guilty that I resisted the inducement.’
      • ‘The report said children were offered biscuits, chocolate and other inducements to encourage them to work harder.’
      • ‘Each was unanimously convicted of ‘corruptly accepting’ the seven-figure inducements between January 24 1995 and February 7 1995.’
      • ‘Most said the pressure from parents was increasing, with 32% having been offered financial bribes, other inducements, or even receiving threats.’
      • ‘The age of consent is 15 but only provided no monetary reward or inducement is offered.’
      • ‘It is possible, the Court noted, for a company whose product passes the test to be guilty of inducement to violate copyrights.’
      • ‘Surely these election-year inducements of extra dosh are mere carrots being dangled from the lines of desperate politicians.’
      • ‘With the exception of Turkey, however, none of them received any positive inducements, in the form of tangible carrots or expressions of empathy to their objections.’
      • ‘The inducement had evidently proved very attractive.’

Pronunciation:

inducement

/ɪnˈdjuːsm(ə)nt/