Definition of indubitable in English:

indubitable

adjective

  • Impossible to doubt; unquestionable.

    ‘an indubitable truth’
    • ‘I look for the driver's expression in their rear-view mirror, but their windows are fitted with tinted glass that hides their indubitable, apoplectic rage.’
    • ‘This faith in the indubitable certainty of mathematical proofs was sadly shaken around 1900 by the discovery of the antinomies or paradoxes of set theory.’
    • ‘Newton repudiated the Cartesian programme of deducing scientific laws from indubitable metaphysical principles.’
    • ‘One of the indubitable masterpieces of his later years is the pitiless Self-Portrait in a Dressing-Room Mirror.’
    • ‘I certainly do not yet concede that it actually exists, until this is proved to me by an indubitable argument.’
    • ‘All right, Callahan, as fun as this little debate is, it's far too early for me to doubt my existence when it clearly is indubitable.’
    • ‘This is evidently about an experience, an indubitable fact (that one may think a liar, but that has been brought into being nevertheless).’
    • ‘War efforts are equated with indubitable patriotism.’
    • ‘The story has many variants, but all of them reflect an indubitable truth - China-made toys are taking a great market share in global markets.’
    • ‘Meme theory strikes many as so obviously true as to be indubitable.’
    • ‘Also, the indubitable suffering of the many people who might be helped by stem cell therapy ought to weigh heavily in the complex moral equation.’
    • ‘If this is so, no judgement, however modest, is absolutely indubitable.’
    • ‘This fact about induction, we are told, is the difficulty that makes science fall short of telling us indubitable truths about the world.’
    • ‘To me, the word ‘revolution’ means death, havoc, dogs of war, and a whole ton of stuff I'm not getting into unless you show me a big, indubitable reason.’
    • ‘According to Mill, many mathematical propositions are not even true at all, let alone necessarily true and indubitable, and let alone a priori knowable.’
    • ‘They say he has used his indubitable oratorical powers to fire the blood of the mob, only to later run for cover, disavowing his responsibility for violence.’
    • ‘Pius IX made his furious rejection of liberalism and national unification indubitable upon his return to Rome.’
    • ‘Aristotle thus does not argue that it is a necessary truth (that is, he does not try to prove the it); rather, he argues that it is indubitable.’
    unquestionable, undoubtable, indisputable, unarguable, inarguable, undebatable, incontestable, undeniable, irrefutable, incontrovertible, unmistakable, unequivocal, certain, sure, positive, definite, absolute, conclusive, emphatic, categorical, compelling, watertight, clear, clear-cut
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin indubitabilis, from in- ‘not’ + dubitabilis (see dubitable).

Pronunciation

indubitable

/ɪnˈdjuːbɪtəb(ə)l/