Definition of inconstant in English:



  • 1Frequently changing; variable or irregular.

    ‘the exact dimensions aren't easily measured since they are inconstant’
    • ‘Alas, the social scene is as fluid and inconstant as everything else in this turbulent country.’
    • ‘The inconstant Moon is well named because the closeness of the Moon to Earth changes with the Sun's tidal force - its differential gravitation.’
    • ‘Cuts in foreign affairs and defense spending, inattention to the tools of statecraft, and inconstant leadership are making it increasingly difficult to sustain American influence around the world.’
    • ‘But fire is a strange stuff to make the origin of all things, for it is the most inconstant and changeable.’
    • ‘The star is still inconstant, however; modern measurements show that, even from one day to the next, T Tauri's brightness can change by as much as half its typical output.’
    • ‘It all underscores the fact that the administration of the resource management legislation in New Zealand is incredibly uneven and inconstant around the country.’
    • ‘Emily, the youngest was brown-haired and had inconstant hazel eyes that commonly bordered on green.’
    • ‘It knows that attention on the part of the western powers is inconstant.’
    • ‘But if pushed, I would wearily point out that the inconstant luminosity was a statement about the haphazard nature of life, about how the world could be either light or dark.’
    • ‘This Stoic tradition was quite clear that respect for human dignity could move us to appropriate action, both personal and social, without our having to rely at all on the messier and more inconstant motive of compassion.’
    • ‘The world is cruel and rancid, the body is a receptacle of foul gasses and inconstant emotions, and the soul is a paltry fiction.’
    • ‘And yet it seems to me that much of what we encounter in our religious life may be called ‘crypto-religious’: elusive, inconstant, hard to define, and yet genuine even so.’
    • ‘At a more specific level, and going back several centuries, histories of national economics show inconstant associations of free trade with economic growth.’
    • ‘The outline of the bright, inconstant moon attends strictly to the position of the sun.’
    • ‘As more information becomes available, the description, definition, and diagnostic criteria may undergo revision, although we do not usually redefine the disease to include inconstant features.’
    • ‘When I ask people why they live in a place so unforgiving, I get straight, immediate answers: wide-open spaces, inconstant weather, even isolation, traits that would discourage many.’
    • ‘‘Good’ and ‘evil’ are inconstant names applied haphazardly by different men to what attracts or repels them.’
    • ‘She had dirty blonde hair which had that straight, heavy look that often comes with inconstant grooming.’
    • ‘Joshua Morgan's life was ruled by inconstant weather.’
    • ‘I think the life of an actor has a divinity to it; its rhythms are so inconsistent and inconstant.’
    variable, varying, changeable, changing, irregular, shifting, fluctuating, inconsistent, not constant, unsettled, unfixed, mutable, unstable, unsteady
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    1. 1.1(of a person or their behaviour) not faithful and dependable.
      ‘the most inconstant man in the world’
      • ‘The individual members of this particular community are by no means all wonderfully multifaceted, but they are at least inconstant, generous and judgmental, visionary and blinkered, capable of extreme kindness and gross inhumanity.’
      • ‘But with Kerry the charge isn't that he's inconstant.’
      • ‘Among her pithy observations was the fact that ‘men are vile inconstant toads’; and that ‘civility costs nothing and buys everything’.’
      • ‘Would that you again resemble the inconstant people who knew only effervescence, which we falsely called enthusiasm!’
      • ‘Our passions, they concede, make us false, foolish, inconstant, and uncertain.’
      • ‘He was an inconstant man, impulsive and greedy.’
      • ‘You either fear his humour or my negligence, that you call in question the continuance of his love: is he inconstant, sir, in his favours?’
      • ‘They're almost cheerfully callous and casually inconstant.’
      • ‘In addition, feminist readings have detected in city comedy the salient traits of a dominant early modern discourse that constructs women as naturally incontinent and inconstant.’
      • ‘Early in the story, the narrator establishes that Diane is representative of her sex in being deceptive, manipulative, and inconstant.’
      • ‘Everyone I should have been able to count on, suddenly unreliable and inconstant, gone forever or drifting away.’
      • ‘And that tells voters (as it probably should) that you're inconstant and unserious.’
      • ‘Hamlet scorns his mother and denounces women as frail, inconstant, and deceitful.’
      • ‘One can be physically promiscuous without being emotionally unfaithful, flighty, or inconstant.’
      fickle, faithless, unfaithful, false, false-hearted, wayward, undependable, unreliable, untrustworthy, changeable, capricious, volatile, mercurial, flighty, chameleon-like, unpredictable, erratic, unstable
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Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin inconstant-, from in- not + constant- standing firm (see constant).