Definition of inboard in English:


adjective & adverb

  • 1Within a ship, aircraft, or vehicle.

    [as adverb] ‘the spray was coming inboard now’
    [as adjective] ‘the uncovered inboard engine’
    1. 1.1Towards the centre of a ship, aircraft, or vehicle.
      [as adverb] ‘move the clew inboard along the boom’


  • 1A boat's engine housed inside its hull.

    • ‘A variety of twin-engine options were offered on the Coastal 2800 over the nine years of production, including factory installed, 225-hp OMC Sea Drives and a variety of gasoline inboards, from 220 to 270 hp.’
    • ‘In the marina I can see two gleaming Sabrecraft, a 37-footer named Little Frégate and the slightly larger Frigate Bird, both with twin 350 hp inboards.’
    • ‘Today, multilevel, multi-year limited warranties are standard on almost all outboard engines and a growing number of inboards, according to a survey by BoatU.S. (See charts at right.)’
    • ‘The engine is a Chrysler 318 V - 8 inboard with a straight shaft.’
    • ‘The four-stroke cylinders do not have this oil coating and will rust when not run for long periods, just like four-stroke inboards do.’
    • ‘The inboards also make a small difference, but they may be too expensive to be worth it, and may not even be available.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the state of California, through its powerful Air Resources Board, is moving toward requiring catalytic converters on marine sterndrives and inboards, ahead of the EPA.’
    1. 1.1A boat with an inboard engine.
      • ‘The Blue Fin is still in rotation, but a 405-horsepower inboard with a speedometer and a sound system is the family boat of choice.’
      • ‘Some 56% of the boats used most often had propeller propulsion and of those boats with motors, nearly 60% were outboards and 26.7% were inboards.’
      • ‘The IPS props - which are smaller than a standard prop configuration - are also in perfect horizontal alignment with the boat's bottom, unlike inboards whose typical seven-degree down angle wastes energy.’