Definition of inasmuch in English:

inasmuch

adverb

in phrase inasmuch as
  • 1To the extent that; in so far as.

    ‘these provisions apply only inasmuch as trade between Member States is affected’
    • ‘It has also been argued that inasmuch as we consider computers capable of holding responsibility, we blame them for our less desirable behaviors.’
    • ‘The promise of the playful, magical world of advertisements is real inasmuch as consumers invest their own interpretations and desires in this consumerism.’
    • ‘I'm game to try and explain it, inasmuch as I can.’
    • ‘But inasmuch as the Design world has an ‘elite’, you are a part of it.’
    • ‘But inasmuch as people's deepest and most mysterious beliefs are being dragged more and more into the public square, America loses.’
    • ‘The two hurricanes are definitely going to have an impact on home prices inasmuch as they're going to impact the availability of building materials and the availability of labor.’
    • ‘Orson Welles once said, ‘A work of art is good inasmuch as it reflects the person who created it.’’
    • ‘The public sphere accommodates these views, inasmuch as it does not ban them - preaching against homosexuality or divorce is not prohibited speech.’
    • ‘Everything smells like pine, which is a nice smell, except inasmuch as it means the cats are all covered in sap and will need to be brushed, and they probably got the sap all over my newly-washed sheets.’
    1. 1.1 Considering that; since.
      ‘a most unusual astronomer inasmuch as he was deaf mute’
      • ‘But we should not forget these slurs - nor expect them to disappear entirely inasmuch as they reflect a deep sort of self-loathing among Western elites.’
      • ‘But I disagree with the first comment here inasmuch as the justices don't change with the president necessarily, they usually survive him.’
      • ‘It is a very necessary provision, inasmuch as in many instances whilst there could not be the slightest moral doubt that the offender was guilty, yet it would be next to impossible to actually prove it by direct evidence.’
      • ‘Today the female tradition is continued to some extent inasmuch as most hospital, hospice, and district nurses who do the job are women.’
      • ‘Breaking our addiction to foreign oil is one of the reasons commonly advanced in support of ANWR drilling, inasmuch as Alaska is part of the United States.’

Origin

Middle English: originally as in as much, translating Old French en tant (que) ‘in so much (as)’.

Pronunciation

inasmuch

/ɪnəzˈmʌtʃ/