Definition of in sum in English:

in sum


  • To sum up.

    ‘this interpretation does little, in sum, to add to our understanding’
    • ‘So, in sum, if you like Musical Barbeque, you'll probably like this, and if you don't like Musical Barbeque, well, I'm not so sure I want you reading this blog, quite frankly.’
    • ‘If you believe in cultural relativism, or that crime should not be followed by punishment, or that our borders should be thrown open - in sum if you oppose traditional institutions and values - you are hardly in the mainstream.’
    • ‘So in sum: yes, the blasé reaction to Wolff's article does reflect a moderating of stances on sexual harassment, but don't gloat about it; the pendulum is still very much on the left, no matter how much you might want it to be otherwise.’
    • ‘There are, in sum, no comforting conclusions to be drawn any where.’
    • ‘The dispute, in sum, turns on the Macedonian Orthodox Church right to be recognised as autocephalous, a status it unilaterally claimed for itself in 1967.’
    • ‘That, in sum, is the history of the American Church's relationship with the Holy See in the past 35 years.’
    • ‘We feel him as an unwitting misfit, slightly apart, unaware of what affection really is: in sum, lonely.’
    • ‘An attachment to your own country or nation or culture, in sum, doesn't have to be chauvinist.’
    • ‘In sum, rising unemployment levels are revealing the full recklessness of welfare reform.’
    • ‘In sum, the principal factors in the reduction of benefits in the coal sector were not the ones that are normally cited in dependency theory.’
    in short, briefly, in brief, to put it briefly, to cut a long story short, in a word, to sum up, in a nutshell, to come to the point, in essence, in outline
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