Definition of in harness in English:

in harness

phrase

  • 1(of a horse or other animal) used for driving or draught work.

    ‘colts are worked in harness alongside an experienced horse’
    • ‘I think he saw them like horses in harness some of which were trying to run in different directions.’
    • ‘Even though mules could carry heavier loads, cost less to run and were more surefooted, they were increasingly used in harness to pull wagons, not as pack animals.’
    • ‘The solution in Hollywood historical epics is to have a boy turning the spit, or as was more common in real life, a dog in harness working a gear system.’
    • ‘Horses played a big part in life on the farm, and the family were either riding them or working them in harness every day.’
    • ‘It is also true that the Monarchy and ‘Establishment’ were more often at odds than not, like ill-matched horses in harness.’
    • ‘Pegasus trots in harness, over the stony pavement, and pulls a cart or a cab behind him.’
    • ‘But by early June the bulls were back in harness.’
    1. 1.1In the routine of daily work.
      ‘a man who died in harness far beyond the normal age of retirement’
      • ‘They were boosted by the return from injury of Nigerian international Jay Jay Okocha, who was back in harness after a four-match lay-off with a hamstring problem.’
      • ‘Tipp will probably go in as the marginal favourites now that their most prolific scorer Declan Browne is back in harness.’
      • ‘He hasn't resumed his GAA duties in full yet just yet, but the expectation is that he will be back in harness to chair the first meeting of 2003 of the incoming divisional board next month.’
      • ‘Back in harness after spells together at Newcastle and with England, the pair aim to inject more steel into a side that is beginning to earn the reputation of having a soft underbelly.’
      • ‘Firstly France, with their star fly-half back in harness, won revenge for their previous defeat, thumping Scotland by a whopping 61-0.’
      • ‘Now that Gordon is back in harness at the club, plans are afoot to create a section of the Bury FC website devoted to the history of the club.’
      • ‘The honour of wearing number 2 fell to John Douglas, who also got to carry the commemorative mailbag celebrating Percy's 40 years in harness.’
      • ‘The former Gloucestershire president who has held virtually every office at Knowle, was back in harness at the South West match against the British Universities at Bath.’
      • ‘In the Premier Division Kendal Town striker David Foster was back in harness for his old club Kirkby Lonsdale and his goal brought them a point in a 1-1 draw with CCM Dynamos.’
      • ‘It knocked her out - but she will be back in harness tomorrow at an investiture at Buckingham palace.’
      • ‘A series of substitutes helped Wright after the former Welsh international was laid low by a mild stroke, but he is now back in harness.’
    2. 1.2So as to achieve something together.
      ‘local and central government should work in harness’
      • ‘Lehmann and Byas were already in harness when Yorkshire resumed the second day on 144 for three.’
      • ‘And once again it was Reape who came good, this time bowling in harness with Mark Beckett.’
      • ‘Within a couple of weeks he'd sealed the deal that will put the two world class playmakers in harness, delighting Wanderers' fans.’
      • ‘The global threat to our nations by multi-national banks and companies working in harness with the ruling class is having a destructive effect on our peoples.’
      • ‘Woodgate has brought some more reassurance, but it is only when Ferdinand and Woodgate are in harness that they really look the part at the back.’
      • ‘Sure, you're going to have occasional missteps as people get better acquainted and work in harness together.’
      • ‘She is even ready to be a partner to Bart instead of a domineering wife: ‘Today she wanted him to know that they pulled in harness together’.’
      • ‘With the two of them in harness - probably some time next month - they will forge part of a powerful front five, especially because England hooker Phil Greening is close to making his comeback from injury.’
      • ‘However, spinners Mark Bell and Dan Broadbent got together in harness to share nine victims.’
      • ‘Progress remained slow after lunch and Somerset were only 120-2 after 50 overs but the over rate perked up as Dawson and Gray operated in harness.’