Definition of impoverishment in English:

impoverishment

noun

mass noun
  • 1The process of becoming poor; loss of wealth.

    ‘fifteen years of political instability resulted in widespread impoverishment and famine’
    • ‘Less education and longer hours of domestic work obviously contribute to women's impoverishment by making it harder for them to attain well-paying jobs.’
    • ‘The consequence of a lack of free trade could be a relative impoverishment of the working population.’
    • ‘One of the arguments proclaimed by the protesters was that globalisation was guilty of causing Third World impoverishment.’
    • ‘The book is a stark reminder that the strongest economic boom in US history did not ameliorate widespread impoverishment.’
    • ‘During times of impoverishment, the jewelry may be sold to provide family resources.’
    • ‘For the majority of blacks, the New Deal at first meant further impoverishment.’
    • ‘The song is a touching, acoustic-guitar driven meditation on poverty, in which the oppressive hopelessness of lower-class impoverishment is palpable.’
    • ‘Many developing and poor nations, however, are stuck in a quagmire of debt and impoverishment, no matter how much assistance they receive.’
    • ‘It is not true that Third World impoverishment is due to Western economic supremacy.’
    • ‘The colonial connection appears to be more likely a route to impoverishment than riches.’
    1. 1.1 The process of losing or being deprived of strength or vitality; deterioration.
      ‘this caused substantial impoverishment of the soil’
      ‘the impoverishment of language’
      • ‘The author not only tracks the literal impoverishment of our planet, but he makes it symbolize the impoverishment of our culture's capacity for symbolization.’
      • ‘Focusing only on exam results is a terrific impoverishment of how you measure educational success.’
      • ‘The simplification of labour refers to an impoverishment of its quality.’
      • ‘An enlivening flicker of other buried colors spreads beneath the surface, but not enough to rid one of a sense of impoverishment, as if the life's blood of the painting has been baked dry or worn away.’
      • ‘To build quickly or formulaically generally entails the debasement of materials, with a resulting sensory impoverishment.’
      • ‘The chairman is involved in expanding audiences for all the arts, but he is especially driven to "expand the country's awareness of jazz, to use it to combat the cultural impoverishment that threatens us."’
      • ‘The environmental group is campaigning for urgent action to put a stop to this wholesale impoverishment of our native flora.’
      • ‘Our educational system systematically has separated the study of history from the study of culture, to the impoverishment of our students' understanding.’
      • ‘Wise, charming and kooky in equal measure, the last thing this e-mail conveyed was emotional impoverishment.’
      • ‘I have always considered it a great impoverishment of narrative art when, in our secular fanaticism, we banish religion or philosophy to escape from the deep existential questions.’

Pronunciation

impoverishment

/ɪmˈpɒv(ə)rɪʃm(ə)nt/