Main definitions of impost in English

: impost1impost2

impost1

noun

  • 1A tax or similar compulsory payment.

    ‘some of the labels are used for the purpose of collecting Customs duty or other imposts’
    • ‘Despite the efforts of leading Federalists, Antifederalists remained unconvinced that Congress would use an impost and excise before resorting to poll and direct taxes.’
    • ‘All we know is that they approached the matter on the basis of achieving their desired profit margin, which included the full impost of the tax.’
    • ‘This was an immense sum that the federal government could not even begin to raise through tariffs and imposts.’
    • ‘In the words of Article I, Section 8, Congress had the general power ‘to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises.’’
    • ‘Second-hand cars, over there, are just so cheap, it is a crying shame that the impost of duty in importing these cars is so great.’
    • ‘The newspaper expressed the hope that the Congress-led government's new 2 percent tax impost would be used to address the problems.’
    • ‘From that point of view, we have very real reservations about the additional 5c per litre excise impost that will arise from this bill.’
    • ‘It had taken the disastrous tax levies of 1786 to finally get a ‘suitable impost and excise’ in Massachusetts.’
    • ‘An increase in taxation of even 2.5 per cent of GDP does not look like a terrible impost on people who are to be so much better off than we are today.’
    • ‘Article I, Section 8 allows for the collection of ‘taxes, duties, imposts and excises’ but only ‘for revenue necessary’ to finance the government and not to protect any business or industry from international competition.’
    • ‘Finally, there is a simple economic fact that mandatory detention is a huge impost on the budget.’
    • ‘More specifically, the Estonian model, like the other eastern European states with flat taxes, retains social security payments as a separate impost.’
    • ‘But speculation on further tax imposts on property have been persistent and were further fuelled by a recent paper from the Left leaning Institute of Public Policy Research.’
    • ‘Customs duty or tariff is an impost on goods crossing a frontier, its purpose being either to raise revenue or to protect home industries.’
    • ‘Whether its an additional $60 million or $200 million of taxpayers' money, it is still an unnecessary impost on the taxpayer.’
    • ‘The financial impost of war would blow out a US budget deficit already escalating rapidly and dangerously.’
    • ‘Goods arrive, plainly enough, on a daily basis and the customs officials who are to determine how duty is to be paid face the problem, on a daily basis, of working out how to calculate the impost.’
    • ‘All payments of hire shall be made free and clear of all taxes, assessments, charges, duties and imposts of whatever nature, all of which shall be for the Sub-Charterer's account.’
    • ‘In the case of property purchase from a private citizen, the buyer must pay a registration impost and a land registry tax.’
    • ‘The money to give people rewards comes from some of the existing taxes on fuel, registrations, tolls and other taxes and imposts imposed on transport.’
    tax, tariff, toll, excise, duty, fee, imposition, exaction, assessment, tithe, payment
    View synonyms
  • 2Horse Racing
    The weight carried by a horse as a handicap.

    • ‘But he will skip the race because of the impost, as will stablemate Mutafaweq, who was assigned 131 pounds.’
    • ‘With the departure of Tranquility Lake, Tout Charmant will carry the high weight of 120 pounds, with Caffe Latte's 117 the second highest impost.’
    • ‘True Direction's impost worried trainer Carlos Morales before the race.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French (earlier form of impôt), from medieval Latin impostus, from Latin impositus, past participle of imponere (see impose).

Pronunciation

impost

/ˈɪmpəʊst/

Main definitions of impost in English

: impost1impost2

impost2

noun

Architecture
  • The top course of a pillar that supports an arch.

    • ‘It is built of stock brick from various sources, and the piers are decorated by stone impost bands and rendered plinths.’
    • ‘The pedimented and ornamented impost blocks between the arches used in his earlier capitols were notably absent.’
    • ‘This space was ornamented with low relief sculpture of winged sun disks and wreaths located on the pedimented impost blocks between the arches.’
    • ‘Inside, the most striking feature is the Saxon chancel arch, with its through stones (up the sides), imposts (off which the arch springs), and through-stone voussoirs forming the arch itself.’

Origin

Late 15th century: from Italian imposta, feminine past participle of imporre, from Latin imponere (see impose).

Pronunciation

impost

/ˈɪmpəʊst/