Definition of implosive in English:

implosive

adjective

  • 1Formed by implosion; tending to implode.

    • ‘The hydraulic press doesn't present the fire or safety hazard the implosive sleeve process does.’
    • ‘It describes an implosive economy of violence in which only an outsider could intervene: it is an economy running on poverty and isolation (not an ontological ‘male’ malevolence).’
    • ‘He looked as if he was about to collapse from an implosive impact.’
    • ‘There are several advantages in using an implosive source for seismic imaging beneath the seafloor.’
    • ‘But none of these assessments really responds to the way this novel repeats, elaborates, and extends Rushdie's earlier representations of explosive and implosive life shapes.’
    • ‘The actor Oliver Reed who played Gerald in the 1969 film had an implosive presence onscreen.’
    • ‘Even though it has a great many potentially implosive elements stacked against its success, it is actually a very good, very intense action thriller.’
    • ‘The scene is utter heartbreak and further clarifies Tracy's underlying implosive anger.’
    • ‘The pressure is implosive; few players make the transition to tennis star without losing a sense of perspective.’
    • ‘This paper describes the basic principals behind this new technology and compares the implosive method with the hydraulic method.’
    • ‘We propose to continue, and hopefully complete, development of an implosive seismic source which can be used on the seafloor.’
    • ‘And aside from an overwrought moment or two, all four actors turn in gracefully subtle and passively implosive performances.’
    • ‘In other words, what interests them are not explosive climaxes, where phrases erupt and spew forth Vesuvius-like, but something more quiescent, thoughtful and indeed, implosive.’
    • ‘It has through its expertise in metallurgy and design diversified through research and product innovation into various fields such as implosive fittings for overhead transmission lines.’
    • ‘This process uses implosive energy to do the work of compression.’
  • 2Phonetics
    Denoting a type of consonant produced in the glottis with an ingressive air flow.

    • ‘She is never given to hysteria, or explosive passion, as much as she is to exploring implosive energy that builds, as if by stealth, into something more meaningful and inevitable.’
    • ‘Empty trances differ from mystical illumination in being implosive rather than infusive absorptions; moreover, trances are dense and dark rather than ethereal and bright.’
    • ‘This translation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into Fula includes implosive consonants.’

Pronunciation:

implosive

/ɪmˈpləʊsɪv/