Definition of impetus in English:

impetus

noun

mass noun
  • 1The force or energy with which a body moves.

    ‘hit the booster coil before the flywheel loses all its impetus’
    momentum, propulsion, impulsion, impelling force, motive force, driving force, drive, thrust, continuing motion
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    1. 1.1 Something that makes a process or activity happen or happen more quickly.
      ‘the ending of the Cold War gave new impetus to idealism’
      • ‘One was that such cheap labour would add new impetus to the expansion of the colony.’
      • ‘First, what are the impetuses for conducting institutional comparative analysis?’
      • ‘An additional impetus for change in the way traditional radio stations do business is on the horizon.’
      • ‘Religious instruction formed much of the early impetus for the creation of Renaissance art.’
      • ‘His firebrand politics lend an emotional impetus and an urgency to his work.’
      • ‘Detectives are reported to be hoping the letter will add fresh impetus to the investigation.’
      • ‘The main impetus for change was the response of the parties to the collapse of communism.’
      • ‘Impetus for creation of the International Lincoln Center can be traced to late 1982.’
      • ‘Further impetus was provided by my teenage son who has embarked on his own photographic odyssey.’
      • ‘And I believe that these new leaders add a new impetus to the situation.’
      • ‘The requirements of homogeneous diesel combustion processes give additional impetuses to the continued development of piezo controls for unit injector systems.’
      • ‘They also gave renewed impetus to the production of deluxe illustrated manuscripts of secular texts.’
      • ‘The power of the Western media in lending impetus to a popular cause is palpable.’
      • ‘He does concede that these scandals added impetus to the process.’
      • ‘We have already seen the impetus for reform of vertical restraints.’
      • ‘And the key impetus for growth will be product innovation and customer orientation.’
      • ‘The expanded literature search was very coincident with the initial search, providing most of the same reasons, purposes, and impetuses for developing peer institution selection systems.’
      • ‘Later in the 19th century a fresh impetus was given to the sport with the arrival of Prince Albert.’
      • ‘One of the most interesting points to emerge is a recognition that with hindsight, European radicalism has once again written itself as a form of diffusionism, its sources and impetuses exclusive unto itself.’
      • ‘The initial impetus for these reforms was to promote a high skill, high wage economy.’
      motivation, stimulus, incitement, incentive, inducement, inspiration, encouragement, boost
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Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin, ‘assault, force’, from impetere ‘assail’, from in- ‘towards’ + petere ‘seek’.

Pronunciation

impetus

/ˈɪmpɪtəs/