Definition of impersonate in English:

impersonate

verb

[with object]
  • Pretend to be (another person) for entertainment or fraud.

    ‘it's a very serious offence to impersonate a police officer’
    • ‘If someone was to impersonate him, what does he think they would latch on to?’
    • ‘She cried real tears instead when the landlord walked in just as I was impersonating him though and immediately threw us out onto the street.’
    • ‘Nor was I amused that someone out there was impersonating me.’
    • ‘If anyone uses similar handles or tries to impersonate someone in a similar vain I will be forced to take similar action.’
    • ‘Again, I have had absolutely nothing to do with the guy and feel terrible that he's impersonating me.’
    • ‘Just over one in ten people owned up to impersonating someone else over email.’
    • ‘In other words, someone impersonates you for whatever reason - usually to obtain goods and services in your name.’
    • ‘The fact that somebody is impersonating you is shocking.’
    • ‘All afternoon he's successfully impersonated a man who's not hurried, not ruffled, and not full of his own importance.’
    • ‘The technology was not designed to keep people from impersonating someone.’
    • ‘That prevents the verifying computer from stealing your password and then impersonating you to a third party.’
    • ‘He loves the idea of cleverly impersonating someone else in a letter.’
    • ‘We should not trivialise it just because I am impersonating someone.’
    • ‘However hard he tried to impersonate someone who is happy with his lot in life, disillusionment and disappointment punctuated his every sentence.’
    • ‘She did seem to be a help at first, but pretty soon she started impersonating you and writing checks.’
    • ‘One of his main concerns was to ensure no one impersonates him at the November vote; impersonations are not uncommon.’
    • ‘A great mimic of voice and gesture, he could impersonate anyone: rich, poor, male, female, elder, youth.’
    • ‘Although I had a go at impersonating him, I couldn't really live up to that!’
    • ‘He claimed the KGB got revenge by sending one of their spies to Scotland to impersonate him, copying his style of dress, with orders to behave disgracefully to get him into trouble.’
    • ‘Anyone who gave false information, impersonated someone else or forged a card faced a £100 fine and two years in prison.’
    imitate, mimic, do an impression of, ape
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘personify’): from in- ‘into’ + Latin persona ‘person’, on the pattern of incorporate.

Pronunciation

impersonate

/ɪmˈpəːs(ə)neɪt/