Definition of impersonality in English:

impersonality

noun

  • See impersonal

    • ‘Many critics of contemporary American poetry have mistaken these assertions for an advocacy of impersonality, obscurity, or evasion.’
    • ‘However, though we may on calm reflection see the virtues of allowing large parts of our lives to follow well-worn paths, modern people periodically feel themselves frustrated by the impersonality and predictability of life.’
    • ‘Woolf's notion of diffuse impersonality is not merely a theoretical condition for artistic creativity; it is the beginning of a mystical idea, an attempt to escape the cell of self-knowledge, a longing for real things.’
    • ‘The house, a 200-year-old country home and former convent, has thirteen bedrooms and a five-star hotel level of service but without a hotel's impersonality.’
    • ‘Computer presentations have become the standard in many fields, although there is a substantial wailing about the attendant impersonality (and often incomprehensibility) of the result.’

Pronunciation

impersonality

/ɪmpəːs(ə)ˈnalɪti/