Definition of impenetrable in English:

impenetrable

adjective

  • 1Impossible to pass through or enter.

    ‘a dark, impenetrable forest’
    • ‘It is no longer an impenetrable island wilderness.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, her last escapade with William had taught her that bathrooms were virtually impenetrable fortresses.’
    • ‘Indeed, paddling up the creek is the best way to get into the dense surrounding forest, which is otherwise nearly impenetrable.’
    • ‘Growing an impenetrable thicket is an alternative option that could blend in with the view beyond the boundary.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, anything that involves more than a simple sense is more complicated and the barriers are often impenetrable.’
    • ‘The country night was one of an almost impenetrable darkness, accentuated by the occasional faint pinprick of light.’
    • ‘But for most parents the school classroom is a place as mysterious and impenetrable as their teenager's bedroom.’
    • ‘Perhaps they had gotten caught up in an impenetrable area of the forest and had to find a way around instead of simply going through.’
    • ‘But the circle of outraged nobles had made an almost impenetrable wall surrounding the king and the prince.’
    • ‘A youngster whose height and strength makes him an almost impenetrable barrier, he was an inspiring character.’
    • ‘To my horror though, I did not catch myself upon hitting the wall, but proceeded to pass through it into impenetrable darkness.’
    • ‘One million men and 1,500 tanks crossed the seemingly impenetrable forests in the Ardennes.’
    • ‘In this way the seemingly impenetrable barriers that separated the two groups began to fall away.’
    • ‘The spiky reed makes areas impenetrable, both for hunting and for cattle grazing.’
    • ‘But I suppose it was too much to expect for him to have a black, twirly moustache and for her to cackle mysteriously from beneath an impenetrable black shroud.’
    • ‘When present, it often forms dense, impenetrable thickets.’
    • ‘I just knew that one day the battalion of trees would overtake this weak stretch of highway and obscure its existence with an impenetrable density.’
    • ‘So the Romans decided it was not the primitive barbarians known as the Caledonii who had defeated them, but the vast impenetrable forest covering the country now known as Scotland.’
    • ‘In front of him was an impenetrable wall that he could not see his way around.’
    • ‘The island is full of impenetrable virgin forest ill-suited to bikes, leaving the last leg to be completed on foot.’
    impassable, unpassable, inaccessible, unnavigable, untraversable, pathless, trackless, untrodden
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Impossible to understand.
      ‘her expression was impenetrable’
      ‘impenetrable jargon’
      • ‘But as a technology columnist, I'm in the business of coming up with confusing and impenetrable reactions to events around me.’
      • ‘Truth be told, our music is a smoky, impenetrable fortress.’
      • ‘Music industry insiders tend to litter their conversation with talk of turnover, market share and the impenetrable jargon of contract negotiations.’
      • ‘Thus, the initiated are separated by high fences and impenetrable jargon from the ordinary folk.’
      • ‘Implacable, impenetrable, it may take five viewings to understand this movie, but it's time well spent.’
      • ‘For non-Londoners it must be an impenetrable puzzle.’
      • ‘Ask a financial market dealer or analyst, and a spray of impenetrable jargon appears.’
      • ‘He might just be the model academic in that he elucidates the otherwise impenetrable idiolect of abstruse theory by using the vernacular of Pop cult allusion, and he makes it seems as if the two were made for one another.’
      • ‘The first three chapters of the book are hard going and, at times, impenetrable and needlessly obscure.’
      • ‘When you know someone really well you develop routines which are impenetrable to outsiders.’
      • ‘The creation of life in general and of the human person in particular is a thing we can know a little about, but also a thing which is shrouded in impenetrable mystery.’
      • ‘The poet seems to be experiencing a kind of existential crisis in a hostile, opaque, impenetrable and uninhabitable world.’
      • ‘Lots of fields have their own jargon that is impenetrable to outsiders.’
      • ‘I found some of the interviews in this book fascinating, others I found impenetrable; but my general feeling was that book didn't deliver.’
      • ‘They forget, if they ever knew, that Shakespeare can seem impenetrable.’
      • ‘The wording of the document is really very easy to understand; it is not written in the usual impenetrable verbiage of the Treaties.’
      • ‘The impenetrable jargon of much postmodern writings is an issue as well.’
      • ‘I have to say I found the plot impenetrable.’
      • ‘The mystery is not impenetrable to intellect or unintelligible in itself; rather, it is not fully intelligible to us.’
      • ‘It misfires because almost every page of it is weighed down by nearly impenetrable academic jargon.’
    2. 1.2Physics
      (of matter) incapable of occupying the same space as other matter at the same time.

Origin

Late Middle English: via French from Latin impenetrabilis, from in- not + penetrabilis able to be pierced, from the verb penetrare (see penetrate).

Pronunciation:

impenetrable

/ɪmˈpɛnɪtrəb(ə)l/