Definition of immodest in English:

immodest

adjective

  • Lacking humility or decorousness.

    ‘his immodest personality’
    ‘TV shows full of immodest language’
    • ‘I worry more than most people about sounding immodest, but in this case, I'm not going to let that bother me, because I feel that we created a template that showed a lot of Hollywood what could be done.’
    • ‘It seemed like an immodest thing to admit, but I thought, ‘Maybe he's right.’’
    • ‘The standard condemnation of people who use ‘I’ too much is that they're too egocentric or immodest.’
    • ‘Mine is an immodest, but by no means facetious, proposal.’
    • ‘They were dressed no differently from youngsters on the town during Spring break in Daytona Beach: casual slovenliness, shorts, short-shorts, t-shirts, highly immodest tops on the girls.’
    • ‘Without sounding immodest, I have no trouble meeting men because I am quite regularly described as ‘a real looker’ and ‘easy on the eyes.’’
    • ‘Let there be everywhere heard the rustling of dancers, the loud, immodest laughter of the theatre; let a succession of the most cruel and the most voluptuous pleasures maintain a perpetual excitement.’
    • ‘Without being immodest, I have not played a single show where I didn't get close to a standing ovation.’
    • ‘If you know anything at all about the tastes of the tsars - think of the Fabergé eggs and you're there - you will understand already how spectacularly immodest the factory's output was.’
    • ‘I know there are many who will disagree, who will say these bare-bellied women are shameless and immodest, but I cannot agree.’
    • ‘‘At the risk of sounding immodest, I know that any history of Tamil cinema will be incomplete without at least a few chapters on my work,’ he asserts.’
    • ‘Don't worry - I don't think you need to worry about being immodest.’
    • ‘There's an immodest bather, drunkards, a glutton (whose stomach does his talking for him), a fool, a woman, a monk, three choristers and a nun - all with a particular story to impart.’
    • ‘In Victorian England, the sight of an ankle was immodest.’
    • ‘At the same time without being immodest, I would say we are the original reformers and nobody can take that away from us.’
    • ‘I wrote briefly about her execution and my editor sent it back asking for more, but - though it sounds immodest - I think I've got that moment perfectly.’
    • ‘Her act describes her rejection by strings of men for being too talkative and immodest, for her unwillingness to commit to caring for a potential husband's ailing mother, and, worst of all, for being a comedian.’
    • ‘The answer must be that this is a dress not seen as ‘Western’ or immodest, and yet a dress that allows one to go to school or college, and to participate in the work force.’
    • ‘This was a reaction to the growing diffusion of wigs which attracted attention, and were considered immodest or brazen in both communities.’
    • ‘This is a particularly noticeable thing about baboons, or perhaps it is what humans cannot avoid noticing - being so well trained to look down upon such immodest displays.’
    indecorous, improper, indecent, indelicate, indiscreet, immoral
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from French immodeste or Latin immodestus, from in- ‘not’ + modestus (see modest).

Pronunciation

immodest

/ɪˈmɒdɪst/