Definition of identity politics in English:

identity politics

plural noun

  • [treated as singular or plural] A tendency for people of a particular religion, race, social background, etc., to form exclusive political alliances, moving away from traditional broad-based party politics.

    • ‘Our party opposes the various strains of identity politics and stands firmly in support of integration and the unity of all working people.’
    • ‘Doing so with identity politics or cultural differences is a loser's game.’
    • ‘It is one short step from parochial affiliations to local mafias that rely on clanship, clientalism, and identity politics.’
    • ‘Discussion increasingly focuses on identity politics and the question of differences between women as well as between women and men.’
    • ‘The magazine also features an essay on New Zealand film Whale Rider, directed by Niki Caro, and its promotion of identity politics.’
    • ‘They have been annexed to any number of political currents, particularly around identity politics.’
    • ‘This was neither social democracy nor the Old or New Left, neither identity politics nor vanguardism.’
    • ‘There are a few folks in various splinter groups practicing identity politics.’
    • ‘In the process, women get caught up in nationalist politics in different ways, and identity politics come to impact on gender relations.’
    • ‘For those interested in identity politics, there were sessions on black liberation and feminism.’
    • ‘When are you going to learn that a focus on social liberalism and identity politics is the tool of the elite?’
    • ‘Third, it sent a message about the importance of what might be called identity politics or the politics of behaviour.’
    • ‘In a recent article in the New York Review of Books, Barenboim attacks the current fashion for identity politics and cultural nationalism.’
    • ‘Yet identity politics disallows political analysis or criticism of identities which are profoundly political.’
    • ‘One of the play's chief merits is that it does not retreat into the type of identity politics generally pushed by so many Asian and black commentators and artists.’
    • ‘It was identity politics, the politics of the special interest groups, of the disadvantaged groups.’
    • ‘They have joined new social movements and have chosen identity politics rather than partisan politics.’
    • ‘The progressive establishment is critical of people who openly discuss questions of race, culture and identity politics.’
    • ‘The scripts of political mobilisation and identity politics do not cease even in the face of a common suffering.’
    • ‘Why, he asks, are the identity politics of gender or race not vulnerable to the same sort of anti-essentialist critique?’