Definition of identikit in English:

identikit

noun

trademark in US
  • A picture of a person, especially one sought by the police, reconstructed from typical facial features according to witnesses' descriptions.

    as modifier ‘an identikit photograph’
    • ‘Or was it when you saw images of earthquake damage, diseased people or identikit pictures of recently deceased people.’
    • ‘There is another identikit in that section, 857 point 4, with a person with long hair, but I think that is a different offender.’
    • ‘She has been extremely helpful with the information she provided yesterday to enable us to put the identikit together.’
    • ‘Police may get a better picture of a suspect by ‘morphing’ together identikits obtained from more than one witness description, researchers said yesterday.’
    • ‘The book will teach children to interpret all forms of abuse, and how to reach the police, give evidence, and complete an identikit.’

adjective

derogatory
  • attributive Having typical features and few unique ones; formulaic or standardized.

    ‘the pub was transformed by identikit ‘Victoriana’’
    • ‘The men can be silvery-haired and fatherly and the women are identikit babes.’
    • ‘Level design is closed off, reduced from the wildernesses and open spaces of the first game to a bunch of identikit corridors.’
    • ‘While many Brits would find the identikit homes lacking in character, Americans prize comfort, cleanliness and convenience above aesthetics - you see it in their cars, their homes and lifestyles.’
    • ‘Solitaire has been on computers since - roughly - the dawn of time, and Bono has been going ‘Doo doo doo,’ in any number of identikit songs of his since he was a nipper.’
    • ‘Along with being made to fit identikit narrative roles, they also are embodied in identikit bodies.’
    • ‘I, like the majority of the superb Bolton fans in the corner of this identikit stadium, - I had to get that dig in!’
    • ‘After riding though nature reserves and past fields with wonderful views of the hills to suddenly be in a seemingly never ending sprawl of identikit closes on a bakingly hot road (no trees) was, well, not nice.’
    • ‘After so much hype, I expected them to be rubbish, identikit indie.’
    • ‘They may be smaller, but each has been given its own architectural character - there is no apparent identikit cost-cutting.’
    • ‘This is dreary background music built for identikit stadia worldwide.’
    • ‘Just loads of identikit semis, a glum high street and loads of hoodies.’
    • ‘‘Too often in the past identikit homes and offices have been built without any thought for how they fit into the local community,’ said Mr Prescott.’
    • ‘He comes across as a real enthusiast, almost a sports-casting throwback, rather than one of those slick and smarmy identikit broadcasters who seem to dominate modern television and radio.’
    • ‘Youngsters today don't know what hasn't hit them with their identikit formulaic manufactured ‘stars’.’
    • ‘Leafing through the brochures, we find ourselves presented with almost identikit destinations, in which the only competition is the cheapness of the beer, the scantiness of the dress, or the wildness of the night-life.’
    • ‘Fire is a dull album punctuated by two great singles and two other good tracks, whilst the rest is dull, identikit garage rock that is usually confined to the realms of a pub band who've taken residency at your local Fart and Firkin.’
    • ‘They would think they knew how the identikit child ought to behave.’
    • ‘They avoided the pitfalls however: the interference from managers who care more about spreadsheets than the product; the identikit results, the dismal filler and songs that sounded great then and like fluff now.’
    • ‘You want an urban flat, but don't want a formulaic development with identikit kitchens and bathrooms, boring layouts and drab fittings?’
    • ‘Yet, if the professionalisation of politics is creating a narrower, more identikit type of politician, surely we see its apotheosis in the homogeneity of the Scottish parliament.’

Origin

1960s: blend of identity and kit.

Pronunciation

identikit

/ʌɪˈdɛntɪkɪt/