Definition of ID in English:

ID

noun

  • [mass noun] Identification; identity:

    ‘they weren't carrying any ID’
    [as modifier] ‘an ID card’
    id, papers, identity papers, identification papers, bona fides, documents, credentials
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • 1 Establish the identity of:

    ‘the Finnish authorities were able to ID him’
    • ‘Police found her body after the attack, but she was misidentified as a woman in her 20s and wasn't positively ID'd until Feb. 3.’
    • ‘The other, a 28-year-old man, suffered minor injuries and ID'd the suspects, who were busted that day and charged with assault, menacing and weapons possession.’
    • ‘Thanks to those sharp-eyed readers who correctly ID'd the Mt. Vernon tree as an American elm.’
    • ‘Frazier's grieving mother ID'd her daughter's body at the hospital - but not before performing a touching final act of respect to her child.’
    • ‘They were checking tattoo numbers and finally ID'd him and found out it was him.’
    • ‘And it looks like the Alabama case actually might be a little bit stronger than the cases in Georgia, because we know that he was ID'd at the scene.’
    • ‘Cops grilled the teen who lured Sandy to Plum Beach after they ID'd the youth through the victim's computer.’
    • ‘We need to do everything we can to ID the source without giving him away.’
    • ‘And they still don't know, in many cases, whether their loved one has been positively ID'd.’
    • ‘Paramedics tried to cover him up so onlookers including a TV camera crew couldn't ID him, the Web site claimed.’
    • ‘He was beaten pretty badly and with the salt water ... well it took the dental records to be able to ID him.’
    • ‘We know that his vehicle was ID'd, and that they captured it nearby.’
    1. 1.1 Ask (someone) to show proof of their age or identity:
      ‘I got ID'd at the bar’
      • ‘If you're under 30, you get ID'd everywhere.’
      • ‘So I went to get a pack of Salem Lights and the woman does a double take at me to double check my age, so I lean across the counter and say, "Look I'll give you five bucks if you don't ID me".’
      • ‘Since I haven't been ID'd for drinks since I was 17, I made a pretty fair assumption that I wouldn't need it.’
      • ‘I can be ID'd for alcohol one week while being a 40-year-old Donny Osmand fan in another.’
      • ‘I got ID'd, passed over my license, was given raised brows by the doorman who told me I don't show my age (Yes!).’
      • ‘I got ID'd four times going to get coffee yesterday, today they wouldn't even let me walk onto 51st today.’
      • ‘For some, this is simply the next step in identity cards: rather than be ID'd at a bar, you may have your wrist scanned for your birthdate.’
      • ‘So far this year, I've been ID'd at all the usual (clubs, bars) but also buying cigarettes, and a Stanley knife.’
      • ‘I came back right around 10:00, and at that point, they had two cops in the side stairwell ID'ing everybody coming back in.’
      • ‘Wetherspoons once randomly came and ID'd me as I was sat in their beer garden.’
      • ‘I'm told she's 19 but I'm betting she gets ID'd all the time.’

  • Idaho (in official postal use).

Definition of id in English:

id

noun

Psychiatry
  • The part of the mind in which innate instinctive impulses and primary processes are manifest:

    ‘the conflict between the drives of the id and the demands of the cultural superego’
    Compare with ego and superego
    • ‘It's just that some of us are better than others at letting our superegos muffle our whiny ids.’
    • ‘They've been listening to their ids for too long - their inner Sharons.’
    • ‘People talked about psychoanalysis - ego and superego and ids and repressed early experiences.’
    • ‘This is a fascinating - and at times unintentionally funny - look at egos in collision, ids on the rampage and lives in crisis.’
    • ‘Psychologists have long noticed that the combination of distance and pseudoanonymity on the Internet tends to unlock people's ids - hence all the flame wars, the UPPER CASE SHOUTING, and the rampant flirting in chat rooms.’

Origin

1920s: from Latin, literally that, translating German es. The term was first used in this sense by Freud, following use in a similar sense by his contemporary, Georg Groddeck.