Definition of hyperactive in English:

hyperactive

adjective

  • 1Abnormally or extremely active.

    ‘a hyperactive pituitary gland’
    • ‘Alternating with these periods, there would be periods of feeling high and being hyperactive and energetic.’
    • ‘Artistic endeavors may be an active outlet for your hyperactive nature.’
    • ‘Or is it creating a neurotic, hyperactive corporate culture in which chief executives are too nervous to make any decisions?’
    • ‘But whilst wild pop videos often have completely hyperactive camerawork, films normally don't and Catwoman is testimony as to why.’
    • ‘Look at all these ladders that we can't use, instead forced to run in random directions below and jump like hyperactive idiots.’
    • ‘I couldn't help but to smile at this hyperactive ball of energy.’
    • ‘But that's the nature of today's hyperactive, overheated competitive environment.’
    • ‘You know, I think it's his fault that the elevator in my building is hyperactive.’
    • ‘Now finally issued on CD, Killing Time reveals Frith at his most hyperactive and unfettered.’
    • ‘The three subtypes of delirium are hyperactive, hypoactive, and mixed.’
    • ‘The hyperactive groups, however, did not differ from each other in the number of time estimation errors.’
    • ‘The HIV virus promotes dementia, then the brain activity becomes hyperactive.’
    • ‘Sure, she was a bit hyperactive, but she came by that naturally.’
    • ‘So where does this tale of abnormal, sane, hyperactive ambition begin?’
    • ‘Mary Ellen's hyperactive guilt complex responded immediately and sat like a prickly insect at the bottom of her stomach.’
    • ‘You've spent too much cold-sweat on false anthems, generic beats, and hyperactive production work.’
    • ‘One can only imagine the trauma that the hyperactive Minister for Europe has endured during the past few days.’
    • ‘How often have we demanded of our priests that they be hyperactive administrators, social workers, or church managers?’
    • ‘After about five days patients enter a second phase in which they are restless but not hyperactive or hostile and are now cooperative.’
    • ‘No interview can proceed without hyperactive jump cuts to tangentially relevant footage or airplanes, cars or food.’
    frantic, wild, frenetic, hectic, fraught, feverish, fevered, mad, crazed, manic, energetic, intense, furious, fast and furious, turbulent, tumultuous, confused, confusing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a child) showing constantly active and sometimes disruptive behaviour.
      • ‘A two-stage screening procedure was used to identify boys who were pervasively hyperactive.’
      • ‘If a student is predominantly hyperactive then a kinesthetic approach to an academic exercise may be beneficial.’
      • ‘And parents or teachers described some 28 percent of the children as hyperactive.’
      • ‘She is extremely hyperactive and impulsive for her age.’
      • ‘Thousands of severely hyperactive children in the UK should soon benefit from a new type of drug, doctors said today.’
      • ‘I've come to realize that being with Tomaz is not unlike hanging out with a hyperactive child.’
      • ‘As a hyperactive child, he wore himself out dancing every day, much to their relief.’
      • ‘Willoughby, an attention-seeking hyperactive child, was, by his mid to late teens, violently deranged.’
      • ‘For years parents of hyperactive children have fought to have the condition taken seriously.’
      • ‘The authors repeated the analysis for the hyperactive probands who had or had not been treated with stimulants in high school.’
      • ‘Women who suffer anxiety during pregnancy are, apparently, twice as likely to have a hyperactive child.’
      • ‘He was difficult, hyperactive and extremely creative, while they were good, if a little dull, Christian children.’
      • ‘Blue softens the energy of hyperactive children's rooms.’
      • ‘I have three hyperactive children and two of them have behavioural problems, so I really need a job I can do at home.’
      • ‘A good child is often termed well adjusted, as opposed to children who are shy, withdrawn, overly aggressive, or hyperactive.’
      • ‘Various means have been employed to assess sense of time in hyperactive or ADHD children.’
      • ‘Some customers are parents of hyperactive children put on special diets.’
      • ‘A theatre full of modern-day hyperactive children still laughs and cheers at all the right places.’
      • ‘I'm guessing it's one of those medical anomalies like giving speed to hyperactive children to calm them down.’
      • ‘I was a hyperactive child who attended the Detroit public schools.’

Pronunciation

hyperactive

/hʌɪpərˈaktɪv/