Main definitions of hype in English

: hype1hype2

hype1

noun

mass nouninformal
  • 1Extravagant or intensive publicity or promotion.

    ‘his first album hit the stores amid a storm of hype’
    • ‘At least the ad campaign-generated hype is valid with Shuggie!’
    • ‘Thanks to Caleb for contacting Wrappamania and getting them a promotion with hype.’
    • ‘They and their patrons reinvented the art of promotion and hype in part by attacking good taste and the stuffy elitism of the art world.’
    • ‘It's regrettable that we've gotten into this market hype about institutions.’
    • ‘From a marketing perspective fan sites and public discussion are a great source of free promotion and hype.’
    • ‘In fact it seems that most of the visible promotional work and match day hype is left up to these passionate few.’
    • ‘The Greens specialise in hype hyperbole, to give it its full name, extravagant and exaggerated comments.’
    • ‘The Super Bowl, too, is about ten minutes of significant action spread out over four hours of hype, puff, pose, and advertising.’
    • ‘Of course, as with most advance marketing hype, he, or his contact more likely, neglected to mention an important fact.’
    • ‘We especially like to promote the small Indie developers who can't afford big hype publicity.’
    • ‘In an age where publicists' hype tells us more than we want to know about mediocre writers, Coetzee rarely gives interviews.’
    • ‘Yes, there was a whole lot of cross promotion and hype.’
    • ‘Can it be distinguished from hype and special effects?’
    • ‘When it comes to building hype, advertising also works wonders.’
    • ‘There was great hype and great public interest in the games.’
    • ‘He asks and answers appropriately in relation to market hype.’
    • ‘Is this just typical overheated advance hype giving way to inevitably unmet expectations?’
    • ‘What is this media hype and publicity stunt for?’
    • ‘In the 21st century, hype functions as the storm before the calm, the entire experience in a sound bite or clever ad.’
    • ‘The films get shown right round the year in early morning shows at inexpensive auditoriums with no publicity or media hype attached.’
    publicity, advertising, promotion, marketing, puff, puffery, propaganda, exposure
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A deception carried out for the sake of publicity.
      ‘is his comeback a hype?’
      • ‘Technology was hype after all, promoted by the criminals of Enron and WorldCom.’
      • ‘An investigative report recently released by the National Labor Committee put the lie to Wal-Mart's marketing hype.’
      • ‘Sometimes we get carried away with a particular hype and there is not due consideration in the law.’
      • ‘There is something amiss in the hype, deception, and implicit greed surrounding the issue.’
      • ‘Like every other dotcom that was carried away by the hype, we got ahead of ourselves.’
      • ‘In reality those claims are more marketing hype than fact.’
      • ‘His appeal is legendary and there is no need for hype or false publicity.’
      • ‘In fact, an English audience is in a much better position to see through publicity hype and cant.’

verb

[with object]informal
  • Promote or publicize (a product or idea) intensively, often exaggerating its benefits.

    ‘an industry quick to hype its products’
    ‘they were hyping up a new anti-poverty idea’
    • ‘You have broadcasters hyping up untested prospects with padded records or falling over themselves just to show the latest fad.’
    • ‘In fact, some people in the publishing industry think it's a great idea, sponsors buying authors to hype their products, but why stop there?’
    • ‘Some aren't convinced, seeing the media as hyping up the album because of her exotic past.’
    • ‘If Seven are wise, they'll cut back on hyping up the series too much, because nothing will turn people off like over-promotion.’
    • ‘Really this is a highly complex matter, but hyping up this year's results as an indication of some worrying trend is really no more than a media construct.’
    • ‘On the contrary, it accepts every claim made by the government as fact, while working to hype the warnings and promote popular panic and anxiety.’
    • ‘So, it decided to use innovation to hype its product as well.’
    • ‘Kweli kept going for almost an hour after he'd finished his last song, dancing and hyping up the crowd while Chaps played on.’
    • ‘Nagel told us there was no point hyping a product that consumers can't yet buy.’
    • ‘Willes had his supporters, even in the newsroom, and his ideas were hyped as a way to save a dying industry.’
    • ‘Press releases and media stories hyping up viruses which are not in the wild should be ignored.’
    • ‘What matters more is real marketing, marketing that involves making the right product, not hyping it.’
    • ‘Swansea isn't an immediate candidate for a city break - not even among the British cities hyping up their cultural attractions.’
    • ‘Maybe I can use all the extra photos in a future article hyping up the release of the Enjoi video.’
    • ‘However Ensor warns against hyping up the level of activity at this end of the market.’
    • ‘You were not startled to see a gigantic piece of toast used as a billboard hyping up a new show on The Discovery Channel.’
    • ‘They're really hyping up the whole free bit, but I'm quite sure the music industry is still getting paid from someone - and that someone is Penn State.’
    • ‘Co-op ad programs with retailers will hype the hose-less product.’
    • ‘But I don't think that we are hyping up expectations at the moment, and I don't think we should start doing it.’
    • ‘You are hyping up the recent militant strike which was carried out by the militants.’
    publicize, advertise, promote, push, boost, merchandise, give publicity to, give a puff to, puff, puff up, build up, talk up, bang the drum for, beat the drum for
    View synonyms

Origin

1920s (originally US in the sense ‘short-change, cheat’, or ‘person who cheats etc.’): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

hype

/hʌɪp/

Main definitions of hype in English

: hype1hype2

hype2

noun

informal
  • 1A hypodermic needle or injection.

    1. 1.1 A drug addict.
      • ‘Heyman hypes Jones as being mad at Undertaker for lame advice and says that Morgan was his number one Smackdown draft pick.’

verb

[with object]informal
  • Stimulate or excite (someone)

    ‘I was hyped up because I wanted to do well’

Origin

1920s (originally US): abbreviation of hypodermic.

Pronunciation

hype

/hʌɪp/