Definition of hurtle in English:

hurtle

verb

  • Move or cause to move at high speed, typically in an uncontrolled manner.

    no object, with adverbial of direction ‘a runaway car hurtled towards them’
    with object and adverbial of direction ‘the trucks hurtled them through the grassland to the construction sites’
    • ‘Would you ignore a truck hurtling towards you as you crossed the road?’
    • ‘When Mr Smith opened the door, he saw a wall of water hurtling towards him.’
    • ‘Forget the track and the horses hurtling by at breakneck speed; the real beasts were here in the stands.’
    • ‘Meanwhile I quite often see other drivers hurtling past at speeds above 30 mph.’
    • ‘After a few more minutes of trudging alone I saw Nick's car hurtling along the road at breakneck speed.’
    • ‘The road was little-trafficked, though cars tended to hurtle past at alarming speeds.’
    • ‘An investigation has been launched after two trains ended up hurtling towards each other on the same track.’
    • ‘As she said her name aloud, a bolt of lightening hurtled towards the earth and struck it with a loud boom.’
    • ‘I am fed up hearing cars hurtling past on that road and nothing being done about it.’
    • ‘Men hurtling towards a mid-life crisis have an unfortunate habit of opting either for a mistress or a motorcycle.’
    • ‘George is hurtling towards me with a silver pepper pot.’
    • ‘I stopped within 12 inches of the car in front only to check my rear view to see another car hurtling toward me from the back.’
    • ‘But only after he saw a giant mass of water hurtling towards the boat did he sense danger.’
    • ‘An arctic hare the size of a collie hurtled toward me.’
    • ‘Children playing along a Swindon road feared for their lives when a car came hurtling towards them.’
    • ‘It had crossed the 5000 mark just a little while ago and was hurtling on all cylinders towards the 6000 mark.’
    • ‘As he did so he caught sight of an object hurtling towards him in a rapid manner.’
    • ‘I was putting my grandson into the car, when a car came hurtling towards us so fast I thought it was going to hit us.’
    • ‘It comes to a rather steep halt, sending my - thankfully empty - coffee cup hurtling towards my lap.’
    • ‘A car was hurtling down the street the wrong way, and someone was just about to pull in to the road.’
    speed, rush, race, chase, bolt, bowl, dash, career, careen, cannon, sweep, whizz, buzz, zoom, flash, blast, charge, shoot, streak, run, gallop, stampede, hare, fly, wing, scurry, scud, go like the wind
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘strike against, collide with’): frequentative of hurt.

Pronunciation

hurtle

/ˈhəːt(ə)l/