Definition of hurl in English:

hurl

verb

  • 1with object and adverbial of direction Throw or impel (someone or something) with great force.

    ‘rioters hurled a brick through the windscreen’
    figurative ‘he hurled himself into the job with enthusiasm’
    • ‘They attack the car by hurling their bodies directly into it.’
    • ‘The motive for the strikes where paintstripper was hurled over their cars overnight last Thursday still remains unclear.’
    • ‘Missiles were thrown, petrol bombs were hurled, barricades were erected, cars were set alight and so on.’
    • ‘Leeds fans responded by ripping out their wooden seats and hurling them towards the pitch.’
    • ‘When police arrived at the house, they were attacked by a mob hurling stones, bricks and fireworks.’
    • ‘Another resident, who not be named for fear of reprisals, said she lived in constant fear of having a brick hurled through her window.’
    • ‘Last summer and autumn France's suburban youths rioted on a nightly basis, burning cars and buildings and hurling missiles at police.’
    • ‘Protesters hurled stones, pounded cars and shouted about the US and Egypt's leaders.’
    • ‘When I was a little kid, I thought nothing of tossing a gum wrapper on the ground, and was even known to hurl debris from our car window.’
    • ‘Angered by the show of force, workers hurled stones, iron rods and machine parts.’
    • ‘He needed hospital treatment for injuries including cuts and concussion - and later found the youths had hurled rocks at his car which is now beyond repair.’
    • ‘Chairs were thrown, objects hurled, electrical disturbances came and went.’
    • ‘Former intelligence officers demanding back pay or jobs hurled stones at US forces.’
    • ‘A woman believes she could have died after a brick was hurled at her car as she drove along a quiet Lancaster street.’
    • ‘The police, instead of stopping the massacre, hurled tear-gas at the protestors converting them into sitting ducks.’
    • ‘The sheer force of it hurled them apart, sending them both flying through the air.’
    • ‘Police in Austria are hunting for a phantom cabbage thrower after a series of incidents in which the vegetables were hurled at cars near Innsbruck.’
    • ‘I hurled the keys, dashed out the door, and sprinted the eight blocks back to our hotel in the dark.’
    • ‘Climbing from the car he hurled his gloves to the ground and then wept uncontrollably.’
    • ‘Two men headed for the front door of the bank armed with guns while the other two stood on the roof of the car and hurled a beer barrel through the window above the cashpoint.’
    • ‘I had visions of a fire extinguisher being hurled from the train, or a toilet being smashed up.’
    • ‘Eastleigh police are vowing to get tough with vandals who are putting the lives of motorists at risk by hurling missiles at cars.’
    throw, toss, fling, pitch, cast, lob, launch, flip, catapult, shy, dash, send, bowl, aim, direct, project, propel, fire, let fly
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Utter (abuse) vehemently.
      ‘the demonstrators hurled abuse at councillors’
      • ‘But when Bradford Council workers came to clear the pile, abuse was hurled at them from angry residents.’
      • ‘Every day, he says, children would hurl obscene and offensive abuse at teachers.’
      • ‘He has been spat at and abuse has been hurled at him.’
      • ‘He was among the loudest of his group, shouting: ‘Come on if you want it,’ to the home fans and gesturing to them as his companions hurled abuse.’
      • ‘The workmen hurled abuse at each other over the clatter.’
      • ‘One night they were hurling the choicest of abuses on journalists.’
      • ‘But journalists who hurl the most appalling abuse at officials of the government are not well placed to act pious when that abuse redounds upon their sources.’
      • ‘A baying mob of youths hurled abuse at firefighters as they battled a suspicious rubbish fire threatening to engulf an electricity pylon.’
      • ‘Racist abuse that has been hurled at Chris Billy and myself, along with black players from other clubs, should not be happening - let alone from our own fans.’
      • ‘However, even with the abuse I hurl at the idiots, it does make for an interesting programme.’
      • ‘Children hurled abuse at him and even attacked him because of a rare condition which has left him disfigured.’
      • ‘It serves as a shield to give her the strength to get through each day, to ward off the insults that have been hurled at her almost from the day she arrived.’
      • ‘He also gives the players a list of abuses to be hurled at opposition players.’
      • ‘Problems included loud music, out-of-control dogs, residents being assaulted and abuse and insults hurled at people in the street.’
      • ‘They say youths have hurled abuse at elderly shoppers, scaring them away, and that the problem gets worse during the half-term school holidays.’
      • ‘Eggs have been thrown at the library doors, staff have been attacked with stones and foul-mouthed youths have hurled abuse at readers.’
      • ‘Deeply aggrieved members hurled abuse at the directors, innocent as they are of any blame for what has taken place.’
      • ‘The court heard that it ended with Young hurling abuse at the cashier including racist insults.’
      • ‘A gang of racist thugs hurled abuse at an Asian bus driver in yet another incident of violence and intimidation.’
      • ‘I have seen what Michael is referring to, plus the abuse which is hurled at apprentice referees from the bleachers is driving a number of them from the scene also.’
    2. 1.2informal no object Vomit.
      ‘you make me want to hurl’
      • ‘But the sight made me sick all of a sudden and I felt like hurling.’
      • ‘I spent the entire night before my Communion in the bathroom hurling up my unworthiness.’
      • ‘That is on top of this story from last week by that made me feel like hurling when I read it.’
      • ‘The one your friends think is adorable, even when it hurls on their shoes?’
      be sick, spew, spew up, fetch up
      View synonyms

noun

Scottish
informal
  • A ride in a vehicle; a lift.

    ‘hey pal, any chance of a hurl?’
    • ‘The buses are crowded with all these old age pensioners using their free travel passes going for a hurl on a warm bus with people to talk to when they should be at home well-wrapped up watching daytime TV.’
    • ‘A 40p ticket on the integrated public transport system gives you access to five metro lines, various railway services, and a free hurl on a bus for up to an hour afterwards.’
    • ‘But such is the risk world leaders take if they fancy a wee hurl on a scooter during some much-needed downtime.’

Origin

Middle English: probably imitative, but corresponding in form and partly in sense with Low German hurreln.

Pronunciation

hurl

/həːl/