Definition of human in English:

human

adjective

  • 1Relating to or characteristic of humankind.

    ‘the human body’
    ‘the complex nature of the human mind’
    • ‘We need to have a much richer account of the way in which the human mind and body operate together in the complex activity we know as sex.’
    • ‘The human body and mind are more flexible than engines and batteries.’
    • ‘It is this characteristic of the human mind which makes an appeal to force necessary.’
    • ‘There, among the babbling minds of the incompetent human race, was my beloved Farrell.’
    • ‘But I consider the human body to be more like the sensitive engine of a fine sports car.’
    • ‘The human mind cannot tolerate the spectre of waste presented by the possibility of chicanery without detection.’
    • ‘This is rather my thoughts and feelings concerning what has happened and what we as a human race need to consider next.’
    • ‘It constantly amazes me how the minds of the human race in general work, or cease to work, as the case may be.’
    • ‘The slide show and the model of a human body facilitated better understanding.’
    • ‘The Enlightenment assumes that knowledge is objective, good and accessible to the human mind.’
    • ‘To understand my point, you first need to take a moment to consider the human body.’
    • ‘Understanding this logic, they believed, might unlock our understanding of how the human mind works.’
    • ‘Galen had worked mainly on Barbary apes, considered closest to the human race.’
    • ‘The human body and mind work according to the nature's laws, which are eternal, and immutable.’
    • ‘The next thing we need to understand is how the human race is meant to move forward towards these ideals.’
    • ‘Our understanding of how the human body was made up was now much more comprehensive.’
    • ‘Similarly, it is irrational to consider undeveloped human bodies as if they were fully developed ones.’
    • ‘Even in the most passive form, the energy requirements of a human body are considerable.’
    • ‘There are no simple formulae for understanding the human mind and how it develops.’
    • ‘This went so far that certain authors considered the human races to be different species.’
    anthropoid
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    1. 1.1 Of or characteristic of people as opposed to God or animals or machines, especially in being susceptible to weaknesses.
      ‘they are only human and therefore mistakes do occur’
      ‘the risk of human error’
      • ‘Its characters offer human frailties, weaknesses and moral dilemmas that draw us in.’
      • ‘She depicts an almost saintly figure, virtually devoid of human weakness or error.’
      • ‘Ray played a video game once where one of the characters was more human than animal.’
      • ‘It never sends any emails, and it can infect vulnerable machines without any human help.’
      • ‘A spokeswoman for Yorkshire Electricity said the mistake was down to human error and apologised for the blunder.’
      • ‘Folktales relate the adventures of both animal protagonists and human characters.’
      • ‘That is all down to human error, and cannot be ascribed to the machines.’
      • ‘I do allow them to choose characters from fiction as long as that character is human and not animal.’
      • ‘The fact that we haven't done this yet is attributable to exactly two things: human weakness and corporate profits.’
      • ‘Investigating the validity of animal experiments is therefore essential for both human health and animals.’
      • ‘It's time to look seriously at whether we really need politicians anyway, given their fallibility and human weakness.’
      • ‘The accuracy of satellite-guided weapons has exposed human error as the weak link in the chain.’
      • ‘Personalising the machine is an ongoing human preoccupation.’
      • ‘And they may just demand it rather than trust their life in the air to a pilot who is susceptible to human error.’
      • ‘These nervous fluids often got the blame for human error and weakness.’
      • ‘Whether that problem resulted from human or machine error may never be known.’
      • ‘We must re-examine all that we do and redesign our many and complex systems to make them less vulnerable to human error.’
      • ‘The mistake Kinsey made was to assume that the human animal is purely animal.’
      • ‘All of which just goes to show that such a venture is extremely vulnerable to vulgar human error.’
      • ‘The very nature of the disclosure process makes it prone to human error and vulnerable to attack.’
      mortal, flesh and blood
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    2. 1.2 Showing the better qualities of humankind, such as kindness.
      ‘the human side of politics is getting stronger’
      • ‘I think it's a very natural human quality to want to broaden out your experience.’
      • ‘I'd parallel, as Blatty does, human kindness/forgiveness with the existence of God.’
      • ‘Medical schools used to put clinical excellence at the top of the agenda, at the expense of human contact and kindness.’
      • ‘Only as the strike nears defeat does his obstinacy acquire a more human, faintly heroic quality.’
      • ‘Forget morality, kindness and other human virtues; just admire the size of the wad.’
      • ‘It's a pleasant show of human kindness in a time when all we seem to hear about is terrorism and violence.’
      • ‘It's the one truly redeeming human quality that runs through everything we do.’
      • ‘It seems that the left has so demonized him they can no longer see him as having any human qualities.’
      • ‘There was, and still is, a very human quality to it - good manners, civic pride and little acts of kindness.’
      • ‘Genius, it turns out, is a human quality, drawing on the world and expanding with it.’
      • ‘We will be closer to elucidating the basis of quintessentially human qualities like language and selfawareness.’
      • ‘The filmmaker has identified certain human qualities accurately enough, but makes too little of them.’
      • ‘This was an India I had never known, where human kindness flowed freely and tradesmen greeted me with genuine warmth.’
      • ‘A certain lustiness, a certain appetite for the pleasures of life, is an attractive, human quality.’
      • ‘As a matter of fact, the lack of such human qualities as honesty, kindness, and public spirit are generally felt.’
      • ‘It is so refreshing to know that there are people who do abide by the codes of human kindness.’
      • ‘He said it had given his dad back his faith in human kindness and after all that has happened, I feel that too.’
      • ‘Both sides trampled on each other's human qualities, so please don't use these saddening words.’
      • ‘His other works of varying scale all have the same unnerving human quality.’
      • ‘An avuncular African doctor had the time to be reassuring and overflowing with human kindness.’
      compassionate, humane, kind, kindly, kind-hearted, considerate, understanding, sympathetic, tolerant
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    3. 1.3Zoology Of or belonging to the genus "Homo".
      • ‘High testosterone levels inhibit hair growth in human males and leads to male pattern baldness.’
      • ‘The neatly piled human bones belonged to three individuals: a woman, a man and an adolescent aged about fifteen.’
      • ‘The voice box structure seen in the Neandertal is identical to current human voice anatomy.’
      • ‘The forepaws resemble slender human hands and make the raccoon unusually dextrous.’
      • ‘They were a little too long to belong in a human mouth and far too sharp.’
      • ‘Other examples include pigments that produce the color in human hair and skin.’
      • ‘This commingling is seen by many reformers as a grotesque reduction to the base material level of human corporeality.’
      • ‘If a human male made sperm on a similar scale, they would be as long as a blue whale.’
      • ‘They belonged to our human ancestors, who helped shape the common psychic heritage of us all.’
      • ‘The bee's eyes, like those of other insects, differ greatly from human eyes.’
      • ‘Do you think the platypus has a placenta, as a human mother would have when she is pregnant?’
      • ‘One of the Americans found a few leg bones and freaked out so they told him it was a buffalo, but I could see it was a human femur and tibia.’
      • ‘There are two different melanins found in human hair, eumelanin and pheomelanin.’
      • ‘At about thirty years of age, the human skeleton is as heavy and strong as it will ever get.’
      • ‘They say coyotes have in some places become habituated to humans and human environments.’
      • ‘Well, Gray's Anatomy clearly shows your human proboscis with two nostrils.’
      • ‘They were predominantly human viruses that acquired some genes from an avian source.’
      • ‘So far nearly all human cases of avian flu have resulted from direct contact with infected birds.’
      • ‘Some have been known to nest in burial caves and may use human bones as nest material.’
      • ‘Tubules in human mouths are sensitive to cold and are normally covered by enamel.’

noun

  • A human being.

    • ‘If the natural environment is naturally subject to change then what about us humans?’
    • ‘In those days, sailing solo meant a form of isolation that few humans could endure.’
    • ‘Of the hundreds of different species of shark, only a few pose any real threat to humans.’
    • ‘The disease could not be passed between humans and was easy to cure if caught early enough.’
    • ‘I did not know about the details of the war, or all that humans are capable of doing to other humans.’
    • ‘Those are the things humans most need to function, and we have placed them at the bottom of the list.’
    • ‘I can feed two humans and two cats for a day and still have change left over from the price of a bunch of flowers.’
    • ‘In fact he probably treats them more as humans than a lot of companies treat their employees.’
    • ‘The tsunami may be an act of nature but humans are complicating the relief effort.’
    • ‘In this heroic period, he revealed a kit of talents which few humans have possessed.’
    • ‘This is probably one of the great shifts in the story of modern humans but we take it almost for granted.’
    • ‘I'm not meant to notice how Gail looks next to other people or how other humans treat her.’
    • ‘The first sweet treat that humans indulged in was most likely honey from beehives.’
    • ‘You try to give them good stuff but these people are not fit to be called humans.’
    • ‘Living in the world's warmer oceans, it feeds on plankton and is harmless to humans.’
    • ‘At least some people are realising that humans are completely abusing the right we have.’
    • ‘But it can do so only to the extent that humans are determined to use it to those ends.’
    • ‘There is every reason to think that you would come across problems cloning humans.’
    • ‘How does knowing the ages of the humans involved have any relevance to the main point of the story?’
    person, human being, personage, mortal, member of the human race
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Origin

Late Middle English humaine, from Old French humain(e), from Latin humanus, from homo ‘man, human being’. The present spelling became usual in the 18th century; compare with humane.

Pronunciation

human

/ˈhjuːmən/