Definition of hullabaloo in English:

hullabaloo

noun

informal
  • A commotion; a fuss.

    ‘remember all the hullabaloo over the golf ball?’
    • ‘Another Los Angeles resident Joe Malkin said, ‘I couldn't understand what all the hullabaloo was about.’’
    • ‘We instantly remembered the whole hullabaloo around the release of the alien autopsy tapes back in 1995 and the controversy it caused world-wide.’
    • ‘When the hullabaloo was over, a leader revealed that it was just a casual chat on the political developments.’
    • ‘Much hullabaloo has been made of independent internet sites and bloggers scooping the mainstream media in breaking stories and battering it to death with fact checking.’
    • ‘But I'll tell you what, I don't get what all the hullabaloo is about with her.’
    • ‘There is very little point in them creating a whole hullabaloo about it.’
    • ‘During the hullabaloo of that time, public support for Delta Team quickly dissolved and its equipment and troops were scattered in the wind.’
    • ‘When a new car is launched - especially one as important to the North-East as this one - it is all too easy to become overwhelmed by the corporate hullabaloo.’
    • ‘So what's the entire hullabaloo about, many tend to ask.’
    • ‘But the festivities will be cut abruptly short by the anniversary, which Hoboken will mark in a manner far more sombre and sober than the hullabaloo over the river.’
    • ‘Do you remember the big hullabaloo when Brian Moree tabled his report on immigration.’
    • ‘Take the hullabaloo about the shooting party, reported to include the Duke of Edinburgh, which shot some pheasant on the Sandringham estate in view of some schoolchildren.’
    • ‘Conservative columnists have had a field day pointing to the Harvard hullabaloo as a sign of runaway political correctness at elite universities.’
    • ‘The hullabaloo following this seemed to unsettled Laois who appeared to lose their concentration, and this very nearly proved to be their undoing.’
    • ‘I've enjoyed your coverage of the recent hullabaloo over the book on ecofascism that I co-authored and its misuse by Senator Brandis.’
    • ‘For example, remember the hullabaloo about the so-called ‘Mozart effect’ a few years ago.’
    • ‘Free trade does not lower wages or cause persistent unemployment There is nothing new in the current hullabaloo about free trade, jobs, and trade deficits.’
    • ‘You can imagine the hullabaloo in the press, right?’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the neighbours create a hullabaloo into the small hours, which has made getting to sleep very bothersome.’
    • ‘Somewhere in the hullabaloo, she got to thinking, ‘Why do we do this, anyway?’’
    fuss, commotion, uproar, hubbub, outcry, furore, ruckus, ado, palaver, brouhaha, hue and cry
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: reduplication of hallo, hullo, etc..

Pronunciation

hullabaloo

/ˌhʌləbəˈluː/