Definition of housemaster in English:

housemaster

noun

British
  • A male teacher in charge of a house at a boarding school.

    • ‘Two teachers, one of whom is Hawkins' housemaster, were struck down by the virus, as was one member of domestic staff.’
    • ‘His exuberance, gaiety and intelligence made him many friends and his irrepressible high spirits and disregard for authority sometimes strained the patience of his tolerant and long suffering housemaster.’
    • ‘He alleged he did tell a second housemaster about the abuse, but nothing happened, so he kept silent for nearly 20 years.’
    • ‘He is the school's third master, a housemaster and its head of Christian Theology.’
    • ‘Humph was born in Eton College where his father was a famous housemaster, and where he was subsequently educated.’
    • ‘Instead, he went into chemistry, left New Plymouth in 1946 and returned in 1952 to take up a post at his old school as housemaster and teacher.’
    • ‘As the stock representative of authority in the building, our housemaster never really stood a chance.’
    • ‘I've done as little gardening as possible since I was a boy because my housemaster used to punish my transgressions by making me go and spend hours weeding his garden.’
    • ‘From the age of 11, I went to a boarding school in Hampshire, where I kicked against my housemaster rather than my father.’
    • ‘It was about the middle of that week that my housemaster caught up with me as we were leaving lunch, asking me to go to his office after the final class at 4pm.’
    • ‘‘It never occurred to any of us at the school in that period that he was anything other than a conscientious, interested and sympathetic teacher and housemaster,’ he said.’
    • ‘According to a new biography, he narrowly escaped being expelled and, at 17, was beaten by his housemaster for flouting the rules.’
    • ‘This was a thrilling first taste of adult independence for us - mainly because we could now sneak out to the pub and back, without having to run the gamut of inquisitive housemasters along the way.’
    • ‘They had to report to the housemaster about meting out punishment.’
    • ‘Richard's former housemaster, Sedbergh School's deputy head, described his former pupil as a ‘fantastically clever boy’ and the ‘best pupil of his generation’.’
    • ‘He was also a pupil and then housemaster at the Roman Catholic boys' school attached to the abbey and run by the Benedictines.’
    • ‘These efforts were rewarded with a position as junior housemaster and English teacher at Shore in 1940, leaving him then with his personal life to set in order.’
    • ‘He's the kind of avuncular, gentle character who could be the beloved housemaster in Harry Potter's Gryffindor house.’
    • ‘From the age of 11 I went to Bedales boarding school in Hampshire, where I kicked against my housemaster rather than my father.’
    • ‘They opted to stay on at their own expense for nearly a year after Mr Williams's employment as housemaster ceased.’
    • ‘It all began at Eton, where his father was a housemaster and where he was schooled.’
    • ‘He was employed there as a housemaster from January 1993 to August 1996 and occupied the school house as a pre-requisite of the post.’
    • ‘My housemaster talked me out of this by explaining that I would have a fantastic time at college, plus my father (a serving officer) warned me that I didn't have the necessary self-discipline to make it in the Army!’
    • ‘He went into chemistry, left New Plymouth in 1946, and returned in 1952 to take up a post at his old school as housemaster and teacher.’
    • ‘He said: ‘It was quite a shock for the housemaster and his young family.’’
    • ‘The 12-year-old, from Faringdon Road in Swindon, had a hospital visit from his Commonweal School housemaster to present him with a certificate for earning 100 house points.’
    • ‘She encourages him to soften his attitude, and he becomes a housemaster.’
    • ‘The next circumstance is that they opted to stay on in The Oaks at their own expense for nearly a year after Mr Williams's employment as housemaster ceased.’
    • ‘He teaches biology and is housemaster of St Hugh's house.’
    • ‘A former housemaster has been jailed for eight years after two ex-pupils broke nearly two decades of silence about his ‘callous and despicable’ child abuse.’

Pronunciation

housemaster

/ˈhaʊsmɑːstə/