Definition of hotfoot in English:

hotfoot

Pronunciation: /ˈhɒtfʊt//hɒtˈfʊt/

verb

  • [with adverbial of direction] Walk or run quickly and eagerly.

    ‘we hotfooted it after him’
    • ‘There are never any guarantees, she could hotfoot it today and be back in court tomorrow morning, but this is a golden opportunity for her.’
    • ‘Mildly depressed, Taylor hotfooted it to Caithness for a bit of regenerative soul searching, and was introduced to MacKay through a mutual friend.’
    • ‘The campaigners hotfoot it back through Bournemouth, past the still-chanting crowd of protesters.’
    • ‘Finally Mary admits she said to Lela that she thought perhaps Tommy had something to do with the dead body, and that is when the frightened girl hotfoots it out of there.’
    • ‘In no mood to argue, I hotfooted it off the train at the next station.’
    • ‘Little town blues need melting away, so he hotfoots it for the bright lights and big cities.’
    • ‘Sometimes our guards have to hotfoot it over to Buckley with extra shotguns and rifles.’
    • ‘They had hotfooted it north in their hundreds to record the first sighting of a rare Snowy Egret on the Isle of Seil, near Oban.’
    • ‘Kieran Richardson's blip will disappear off Lord Ferg's radar when he hotfoots it to Everton in the summer.’
    hurry, dash, run, race, sprint, bolt, dart, gallop, career, charge, shoot, hurtle, hare, bound, fly, speed, zoom, streak, make haste, hasten
    tear, belt, pelt, scoot, zap, zip, whip, leg it, steam, go like a bat out of hell, burn rubber
    bomb, bucket
    wheech
    boogie, hightail it, clip, barrel
    drag ass, haul ass, tear ass
    post, hie, haste
    View synonyms

adverb

  • In eager haste.

    ‘he rushed hotfoot to the planning office to object’
    • ‘He will arrive in Bradford on Avon hotfoot from Highgrove where he will have donned the garb of Father Christmas for the Prince of Wales's Christmas party.’
    • ‘Ophelia, a spy herself, comes hotfoot to tell of Hamlet's first piece of odd behaviour.’
    • ‘It was still there a couple of years ago when Brendan Laney and Todd Blackadder arrived hotfoot from an NPC final.’
    • ‘British withdrawal from ‘East of Suez ‘brought the Soviet navy hotfoot into the Indian Ocean, not least from Vladivostok.’’
    • ‘The most bizarre thing - for me, anyway - was meeting Maria, who entered the pub hotfoot from Mexico.’
    • ‘The local priest sent word to the Station that same night that he heard of poteen being sold in full view and openly at a certain premises and could I go there hotfoot?’
    • ‘As a result of this broadcast ITV was inundated with inquiries and the camera team was sent hotfoot to film the pupils at Biddenham Upper School and to chat with them.’
    hastily, hurriedly, speedily, quickly, fast, rapidly, swiftly, without delay, in haste, at top speed, at full tilt, as fast as possible
    headlong, post-haste, pell-mell, helter-skelter
    at a lick, like the wind, like greased lightning, at warp speed, like a bomb, like mad, like crazy, like blazes
    like the clappers, at a rate of knots, like billy-o
    lickety-split
    apace, hurry-scurry
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

hotfoot

/ˈhɒtfʊt//hɒtˈfʊt/