Definition of hotchpotch in English:

hotchpotch

noun

British
  • 1A confused mixture:

    ‘a hotchpotch of uncoordinated services’
    • ‘This corporate milieu suits the man who convinced a hodgepodge of individuals, corporations and governments to join him in raising the cash to construct a new space to accommodate Calgary's burgeoning theatre scene.’
    • ‘By combining a hodgepodge of miscellaneous claims with no apparent context, the author has created a scary image of impending doom.’
    • ‘The group creates a sort of subversive performance art, with a hodgepodge of unorthodox and sometimes silly scientific projects commissioned to expose the inadequacies and evils of modern biotech research.’
    • ‘The content is currently a hotchpotch of what is available (for free), and what a variety of educational institutions around the country can rustle up.’
    • ‘The locally based Cancer Research Society, one of a hodgepodge of Canadian anti-cancer groups, receives no government cash and raises $11-million a year to figure out how to beat the disease.’
    • ‘He oversees a hodgepodge of intelligence agencies, but he doesn't have the authority to hire or fire agency heads.’
    • ‘So the cabinet has wound up consisting of a hodgepodge of people of different ideologies who find it virtually impossible to build team spirit.’
    • ‘Now, for the simplest act of finding a phone number from a finite list, we are faced with a hotchpotch of different companies, all charging different amounts, all applying different conditions.’
    • ‘The main shopping thoroughfares of Lord, Church, and Bold Streets, achieve, in spite of a dearth of any really good buildings, and a hotchpotch of eccentric styles, quite a pleasing effect.’
    • ‘We're like a hodgepodge of colored jellybeans all in one big jar!’
    • ‘A nationalised corporation, Amtrak, runs all the trains on tracks owned by a hotchpotch of companies (again the effective reverse of the British situation).’
    • ‘The villa itself is a hotchpotch of classical bits and bobs (‘fragments of ancient marble… stuck into the walls like nuts in nougat ’, as Chatwin puts it).’
    • ‘Opting for the latest trend every year can result in a hotchpotch of investments too heavily exposed to a particular risk in the economy.’
    • ‘The decor is a hodgepodge of retro furniture and bistro posters, and it hasn't really settled on what vibe it wants to send to customers.’
    • ‘After three years of political stalemate, the governing party and the opposition - a hodgepodge of small political parties, business leaders and student groups - are finally sitting down at the negotiating table.’
    • ‘Overshadowed by the Minster, the largest gothic cathedral in northern Europe, York is a hotchpotch of narrow, cobbled lanes and medieval alleyways.’
    • ‘The result is a system that is a hodgepodge of mostly public ownership and some private, without any clear direction from government.’
    • ‘The eclectic set dressings and costumes call to mind a hodgepodge of charmingly cheesy pop moments.’
    • ‘This is a truly dreadful movie, a hotchpotch of historical inaccuracies and romantic fiction.’
    • ‘Besides, what person - religious or not - would accept that her belief system is a hodgepodge of ‘truths and fallacies?’’
    mixture, mix, mixed bag, assortment, assemblage, collection, selection, jumble, ragbag, miscellany, medley, patchwork, pot-pourri
    melange, mess, mishmash, confusion, clutter, farrago
    hodgepodge
    mash-up
    gallimaufry, olio, olla podrida, salmagundi
    View synonyms
  • 2A mutton stew with mixed vegetables.

    • ‘To call the Scottish legislative programme a hotchpotch is an insult to stews.’
    • ‘Lunenburg puddin’ and hodgepodge, the way we do it, you really can't find it anywhere else.’

Origin

Late Middle English: variant of hotchpot.

Pronunciation:

hotchpotch

/ˈhɒtʃpɒtʃ/