Definition of hot under the collar in English:

hot under the collar

phrase

informal
  • Angry, resentful, or embarrassed.

    • ‘On that occasion, in a beer and burger joint somewhere near Terlingua, Papa began to get hot under the collar when a drunk at the bar kept looking at Mother.’
    • ‘He has already mischievously implied that only hacks get hot under the collar about his revamping of Waugh because ‘Evelyn Waugh was a journalist too, of course, and so the press are protective of him.’’
    • ‘Now the sight of blacked out windows have got a council hot under the collar because they say lapdancers are putting on ‘private performances’ behind the smokescreen glass.’
    • ‘Despite the plethora of boobs, torsos and bottoms displayed in newspapers which like to call themselves respectable, it seems editors still get hot under the collar when it comes to showing genitalia.’
    • ‘It takes a lot to get the average accountant hot under the collar, but proposed new global accounting rules have hundreds of Australian bean-counters fuming.’
    • ‘With candidates, journalists, activists, police and counters packed into a pokey conference suite opposite the stadium, things were getting a little hot under the collar as results streamed in from across the county.’
    • ‘But while the liberal left world of comedy and satire continue to get hot under the collar about the same old issues, they fail to grasp what's changed over recent years, and the fact that their material no longer hits the mark.’
    • ‘All of a sudden the omnipotent Ondangwa Town Council became hot under the collar and declared that the previous Council's resolutions were unconstitutional.’
    • ‘To be honest, I didn't really watch Crossroads during its Seventies heyday, although I do remember getting rather hot under the collar when a post-Gregory's Girl Dee Hepburn joined the cast in 1987.’
    angry, annoyed, furious, irate, infuriated, incensed, enraged, cross, in a temper, irritated, put out, fed up, aggrieved
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