Main definitions of host in English

: host1host2host3

host1

noun

  • 1A person who receives or entertains other people as guests.

    ‘they were always gracious hosts at the numerous dinner parties they held for friends’
    • ‘The Moreton children entertained their hosts with wartime songs, including Run, Rabbit, Run and the Dad's Army theme song Who Do You Think You Are Kidding, Mr Hitler?’
    • ‘Following these banquets of culinary delights, in poetry and prose, guests would laud the host and the pleasures they found in his food.’
    • ‘The horses pulling the carriage suddenly took fright for no apparent reason, snapped the traces and bolted off, startling both the hosts and their guest of honour.’
    • ‘But in the six months that followed, by many accounts, a coolness developed between hosts and guests.’
    • ‘I've been covering all kinds of events for many years and have sort of worked out a system of taking photos as soon as the party starts with as little bother as possible to the host and guests.’
    • ‘One of my fellow guests, the host whispered, was a vegetarian - did I mind?’
    • ‘Chloe heard herself murmur polite thank-yous and good nights to their hosts and the various guests they encountered on their path to the front door.’
    • ‘The hosts and guests later enjoyed a candlelit dinner in the grounds.’
    • ‘The visit received a great deal of media attention and both the host and guest were pleased with the results.’
    • ‘This tradition can be observed at political and diplomatic events when a host receives an important guest.’
    • ‘In Korea, the glass is emptied and the last few drops are shaken out, then it is passed to the guest and the host refills the glass.’
    • ‘In the event of unannounced guests, the host and hostess will usually sit beside the table.’
    • ‘Inmates serving as hosts greeted the guests, made seating arrangements, served lunch and cleared tables.’
    • ‘Out of politeness your hosts and the guests will occasionally talk to you in English, but don't be surprised if they get frustrated and revert to French for an hour or two.’
    • ‘Richard and Judy are like hosts at a dinner party whose guests discuss them endlessly on the way home.’
    • ‘I can only hope that I am being as good a guest as they are hosts.’
    • ‘But remember: the host has many other guests to attend to, so don't be offended if they don't devote all their time to your personal comfort.’
    • ‘But some of the traditional families are still in residence, aristocratic hosts who graciously receive paying guests and sit them down to dinner amongst the family silver.’
    • ‘It was the duty of her noble hosts to lay on entertainments as she went about the country.’
    • ‘A limerick man of the world visiting a neighbour was handed the tv remote for entertainment when his host was temporarily called out of the house.’
    party-giver, entertainer, hostess
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The presenter of a television or radio programme.
      ‘your host is Stuart Macmillan’
      • ‘In the bizarre world of conservative television pundits and talk radio hosts, loyalty means supporting the wars they support.’
      • ‘The hosts of the BBC's main TV and radio news bulletins typically earn at least £150,000 a year.’
      • ‘These days, she works as a daytime television presenter, gameshow host and author.’
      • ‘I'll be having a chat with the guest host of the show, Crane Durham.’
      • ‘He's currently the host of the radio programme Pepper on Power 102FM.’
      • ‘This term, in the sense that it is being bandied about by talk radio hosts and listeners alike, is new to me.’
      • ‘Eventually, though, it became difficult to get in and out of my car, which is tricky when you're the host of a television programme that mostly involves getting into and out of cars.’
      • ‘So far, on-air replies to prodding by radio and television hosts have cast the candidate in an unfavourable light.’
      • ‘He is checking into a treatment center for the next 30 days, and turning his show over to guest hosts.’
      • ‘The GMTV host will present his own programme starting just after the Olympics from Saturday 28 August.’
      • ‘These beliefs are being openly propagated to an audience of millions by shock-jock radio hosts across the Deep South - many of whom can be listened to over the web, if you can bear it.’
      • ‘But you still get the likes of Vincent Price, Candace Bergen and Twiggy appearing as guest hosts.’
      • ‘It bewilders the 22 regular panelists on the show, every one of whom was asked to continue with this new program, some of them as guest hosts.’
      • ‘Radio talk show hosts will be broadcasting their shows live from Baghdad, Iraq.’
      • ‘Since Limbaugh left the show, his spot has been filled by several guest hosts, including Tony Snow, Walter Williams and Matt Drudge.’
      • ‘Last December, he became one of the guest hosts at 101.7 FM, teaching English to whitecollar workers on the air.’
      • ‘Throughout the programme there will be live sections from Edinburgh, where comedian Craig Hill will be the television host.’
      • ‘America now has many opinionated television and talk radio hosts, who have presented their one sided and often inflammatory view of the situation.’
      • ‘One of the radio talkback hosts at the centre of the renewed debate is Leighton Smith, the morning presenter at the Auckland station NewsTalk ZB.’
      • ‘The loss of star programme hosts could dent Commercial Radio's bottom line, say Hong Kong advertisement buyers.’
      presenter, compère, master of ceremonies, mc, anchor, anchorman, anchorwoman, announcer, link person
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A person, place, or organization that holds an event to which others are invited.
      ‘Innsbruck once played host to the Winter Olympics’
      • ‘Glasgow's Barrowlands has been host to many a star, from Donatella Versace and Lulu to Simple Minds and Runrig.’
      • ‘The main town along the Alpine Road is Garmisch-Partenkichen, which first became famous as a host of the Winter Olympics back in 1936.’
      • ‘What should have been a difficult test for Ayr turned into a romp as the hosts ransacked their guests.’
      • ‘This, the argument goes, is going to spoil it for everyone because Olympic chiefs will gauge enthusiasm for the games from throughout the host nation before awarding the event.’
      • ‘A spokesman for the Department of Health said: ‘It is common-sense that the hosts of any large event are adequately equipped.’’
      • ‘Speaking of album launches, the White House Hotel in Ballinlough played host to two such events over the past three weeks.’
      • ‘Once again Sligo Yacht Club proved themselves excellent hosts and organisers by bringing this important national event to the West.’
      • ‘It will cement O'Brien's commitment to the host nation of the 2010 World Cup, and the country of his birth.’
      • ‘It should not have been an issue as the hosts shaded an entertaining first half when there could easily have been a couple of goals at each end and then ran away with the second half in every way except on the scoresheet.’
      • ‘The beautiful Treasure Hill Golf and Country Club was host for a Stableford competition with dry and firm fairways and very fast greens.’
      • ‘Four teams in addition to the hosts were invited to participate: University of Toronto, McMaster, Western and University of Guelph.’
      • ‘St Nathy's Hall played host to the event entitled ‘Celebrating difference’.’
      • ‘The beautiful and pristine Bangpakong Riverside Country Club was host for a Stableford competition.’
      • ‘Sligo County Council played host to a delegation of Travel Agents from Canada and America in the Civic Headquarters, Riverside last week.’
      • ‘Geneva has always played host to the event since it began in 1971.’
      • ‘As always, the courses in and around Tramore played host to the event and once again, a superb week was had by all.’
      • ‘In fact, the desert oasis has played host to this event in five of the past six years.’
      • ‘Both the US and beaten World Cup finalists China are among the eight teams invited to play in the event, which includes hosts Australia and Brazil.’
      • ‘Dempsey's actions came at the end of a scramble over the right to an event that would bring money and political prestige for the host nation.’
      • ‘All the funds raised during the event will be distributed between Tendring Technology College, the hosts of the fun run, and local charities’
    3. 1.3 An area in which particular plants or animals are found.
      ‘Australia is host to some of the world's most dangerous animals’
      • ‘Due to its relatively unspoiled and undeveloped condition, this area is also host to large populations of numerous other species.’
      • ‘The area is host to wildlife such as owls, skylarks, brown hares and a host of wildlife of all kinds.’
      • ‘He estimated that this small area was playing host to about 100,000 starlings.’
      • ‘This tree is also a host to Charaxes butterflies, one of which is the magnificent blue-spotted Emperor butterfly.’
  • 2Biology
    An animal or plant on or in which a parasite or commensal organism lives.

    • ‘Carbon flows out from the plant host to the fungus, and mineral nutrients flow from the fungus to the plant.’
    • ‘If blood parasites have a detrimental effect on their hosts, heavy parasite infections will correlate with low host reproductive success.’
    • ‘Thus, defenses evolved in response to one parasite can give hosts protection against other parasitic species.’
    • ‘This approach needs to be refined and extended to other associations between parasitic plants and their hosts.’
    • ‘Parasites that manipulate the sex of their hosts are called reproductive parasites - and they are not as rare as one might like to think.’
    1. 2.1 A living cell in which a virus multiplies.
      • ‘To observe the interaction of HIV with the host cell, there had also been attempts to label the virus with GFP.’
      • ‘Further work is needed to elucidate the connection between the packaged conformation and the end goal of the viral packaging, the ability for the virus to eject its genome from the capsid into the host cell.’
      • ‘Once the new bacteriophage is packaged, the now-virulent viruses lyse the host cell and escape into the surrounding medium to infect other hosts, producing further progeny.’
      • ‘Removal of sialic acid enables a virus to enter a host cell to replicate as well as to exit the host cell.’
      • ‘The relation between viruses and their hosts is complex, and usually begins when a virus makes contact with a potential host cell.’
      • ‘Bacterial affinity for the host cell is known to be influenced by cell surface hydrophobicity.’
      • ‘Such viruses enter the host cell and then rapidly multiply inside the cell before killing it.’
      • ‘By this manipulation the virus is able to replicate along with its host cell, while keeping itself fairly well hidden from immunologic surveillance.’
      • ‘When the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes invades the body, it commandeers its host cell's actin cytoskeleton to invade other cells.’
      • ‘In addition, the bacterial host cell can be grown easily in defined media with a short generation time, and the virus replication is lytic, releasing several hundred progeny per cell.’
      • ‘Another HCV model system is needed to show the beginning stages of the viral life cycle - viral entry into host cells and viral activity in the host cell before replication.’
      • ‘The RT enzyme converts the single-stranded virion into doublestranded DNA for subsequent integration into the host cell genome.’
      • ‘A virus needs a suitable host cell in order to reproduce.’
      • ‘A virus is a parasite, which needs a host cell to live in, and a microbe is a bacterium, which is a living cell in its own right.’
      • ‘Inside its host cell, the HIV retrovirus uses an enzyme called reverse transcriptase to make a DNA copy of its genetic material.’
      • ‘What actually happens is that the virus inserts itself into the host cell, and in the host cell it sends out the message to the host cell to reproduce the proteins which are essential for the virus.’
      • ‘When the spores completely fill the host cell cytoplasm, the cell lyses and releases the spores to the surroundings.’
      • ‘The infection of a cell by a virus is a complicated multistage process during which the virus penetrates the host cell membrane.’
      • ‘To gain entry, a virus binds to receptors on the surface of the host cell, and is taken up into a vesicle, or sphere, inside the cell.’
      • ‘Third, the viral genetic material takes over the operation of the host cell, forcing the host cell to manufacture new virus.’
  • 3A person or animal that has received transplanted tissue or a transplanted organ.

    • ‘Thus, a mid-tibia amputation, when grafted to the mid-femur of a host, will heal without intercalation.’
    • ‘This approach reported above both requires the host to grow the organ and may not yield a perfectly immune compatible organ.’
    • ‘The intensity of the rejection response is determined by both the biology of the tissue and the host's response to that tissue.’
    • ‘If the host was suitable, both couples received in depth counselling.’
    • ‘Nodule formation involves responses of the host in various root tissues.’
    • ‘There are the intelligent sows called pigoons, bred as hosts for human transplant organs.’
    • ‘The absence of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in the human host is advantageous with regard to drug development.’
    • ‘Thawed slices of ovary might be grafted to the host, either to the remaining ovarian site or to an ectopic site such as the uterus or under the skin.’
    • ‘Later tissue staining showed that the implants' vessels grew into the host tissue and the host's vessels grew into the constructs.’
    • ‘Thus, the rescued eye tissues arise from the host and not the donor.’
    • ‘Scientists have discovered that up to 20 percent of a donor heart may be composed of host tissue within days of the transplant.’
    • ‘The bulk of pulmonary inflammatory cells in the recipient animals originate from the host and are not the transferred cells.’
  • 4A computer which stores a website or other data that can be accessed over the Internet or which provides other services to a network.

    • ‘The device is coupled to a host computer that displays a cursor in a graphical environment, such as a GUI, on a display screen.’
    • ‘The memory manager manages data transmission and reception between a host computer and a flash memory.’
    • ‘Readers are also introduced to the firewall, which acts as a sort of traffic constable, that filters data flow between a host computer and the Internet.’
    • ‘In either case, software runs on a real-time operating system, but it can be accessed from a host computer using an Ethernet connection.’
    • ‘A graphical user interface may be used on the host computer interfaced to the printer to select various parameters of printer operation.’
    • ‘I suggest checking your intended host computer to see if it has a serial port, because a lot of newer machines delete them in favor of USB.’
    • ‘Underneath sit the headphone jack and the mini-USB 1.1 connector used to interface with the host computer.’
    • ‘A front-end portion of the directors is electrically connected to the host computer and a rear-end portion of the directors is electrically connected to the bank of disk drives.’
    • ‘Sony will next month ship what it claims is the world's first external DVD recorder that can also operate without a host computer.’
    • ‘One of the main disadvantages, however, is that it is not possible to share disk storage between multiple host computer systems with CPU-based software RAID solutions.’
    • ‘The frame grabber, or video capture card, interfaces the imaging units to the host computer.’
    • ‘The card slots into the host computer's full-size USB 2.0 port beneath the prong that usually fits inside a USB connector's metal sheath.’
    • ‘When you copy the DB files from one host to another, if the two hosts have different versions of Berkeley DB, the new host will not be able to read the files from the old host.’
    • ‘It has also been claimed that part or all of the device's memory can be mounted on a host computer's desktop as a removable storage device.’
    • ‘Skype operates, as usual, across the host computer's broadband Internet connection.’
    • ‘DAS is the most basic level of storage, in which storage devices are part of the host computer, as with drives, or directly connected to a single server or PC.’
    • ‘A host computer must consistently provide data at a full 11.08 megabits per second during any recording to avoid buffer underrun errors.’
    • ‘The first image forming apparatus is connected to the host computer so as to print the image data provided from the host computer.’
    • ‘The communications link provides a communication medium by which users can access the host computer from remote locations.’
    • ‘The application program is located on a workstation, and the legacy DBMS is located on a host computer.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Act as host at (an event) or for (a television or radio programme)

    ‘Canada was asked to host a Commonwealth conference in Ottawa’
    • ‘They write a newspaper column, host radio or television talk shows, and may write for magazines or websites.’
    • ‘All but one of the 25 largest cities in the U.S., and two-thirds of the next 25, host these projects.’
    • ‘Eager to endear herself to the assembled press, Brandy hosts three dinners where she meets and greets and poses for pictures.’
    • ‘Up the Creek hosts well known acts as well as new comedians.’
    • ‘In the early 1980s he'd host seven or eight bands for a small crowd.’
    • ‘Local artist Amy Berry will also host four-hour ‘Art With a Sting’ ceramic workshops.’
    • ‘He's an activist for the disabled, and he hosts Yes We Can!’
    • ‘Martin said that the state campaign wanted Macalester to host Kerry's only pre-caucus Minnesota appearance.’
    • ‘Marty Whelan will again host the televised event.’
    • ‘Does anyone find it odd that the former ‘jerk’ is now a respectable choice to host Hollywood's biggest bash?’
    • ‘She then met Dr. Hugo Rosen, who invited her to take part in a trial of the induction therapy for hepatitis C he was going to host in Portland.’
    • ‘The city also plans to host four free or low-cost spay-and-neuter clinics throughout the year, Fusco said.’
    • ‘The site also will host more extensive chat, promotional game and merchandising elements.’
    • ‘The 2003 All-Star Game was Atlanta's to host but it was Michael Jordan's to own.’
    • ‘Roman Dolinich, a well known squash figure in the Ukraine has announced that Kiev will host for the first time ever a men's pro squash event.’
    • ‘The event was hosted by television comedian Tony Hawks, star of Whose Line is it Anyway?’
    • ‘In fact, Colleen may say she wants to go back to school, but I say give the girl a sitcom or an MTV show to host, post haste!’
    • ‘In the week leading up to the event, Glasgow will host fan parties, including the NFL Experience, an American football theme park in George Square.’
    • ‘Wade lives in London and New York, gives motivational talks, hosts corporate tennis events, and works as a tennis commentator.’
    • ‘It will take years to measure the effectiveness of the academy, which the M & A Group hopes to host annually.’
    give, throw, have, hold, provide, put on, lay on, arrange, organize
    present, introduce, compère, front, anchor, announce, be the presenter of
    View synonyms
  • 2Store (a website or other data) on a server or other computer so that it can be accessed over the Internet.

    ‘Columbia University currently hosts some 400 websites’
    • ‘Diebold recently stopped sueing ISPs for hosting the leaked material.’
    • ‘Netcraft compared the sites which are now hosted on Windows 2003 with their operating system in December 2002.’
    • ‘The court separately ruled that links to sites hosting the images were not infringing copyright.’
    • ‘The malicious site (hosted in Poland) also harbours a secondary line of attack designed to dupe Windows users, reports Secure Computing.’
    • ‘Started in 1965, the great UbuWeb now hosts an extensive archive of the ten issues.’
    • ‘With SMBs the common areas of application for Linux are for file and print applications, web serving, hosting, caching, email systems and firewalls.’

Phrases

  • mine host

    • humorous The landlord or landlady of a pub.

      ‘mine host raised his glass of whisky’
      • ‘‘Sometimes we do,’ said mine host, ‘but as you are a special guest we thought you'd like it neat.’’
      • ‘Bob Morrison, the winner, was presented with the coveted mug by mine host Bjarne.’
      • ‘Indeed, it appears to be compulsory to have a drink or two with large David, and he is certainly a most affable mine host.’
      • ‘I've been in restaurants in Brussels where I felt like a welcome guest in somebody's home, the waiter playing the role of mine host to perfection.’
      • ‘I'm told one of the attractions in the culinary department is the ‘Up To Me’ soup, lovingly prepared by the wife of mine host Lord Clive.’
      • ‘No one listened as telly pundits Lineker, Hanson and O'Neill droned on, and then, as the teams lined up, mine host killed the volume and put on Three Lions.’
      • ‘Mark Kelly, mine host at Altrincham's Tatton Arms, will knock 50p off the price of a pint to anyone over 60.’
      • ‘This happy group enjoyed a wonderful night at the Poppy Garden with mine host, Chatchalit ‘Pui’ (far right) shouting a round for his customers.’
      • ‘As well as his player of the year trophy, Fairclough won £350 courtesy of sponsors The Unique Pub Co - mine host to pubs in York and across the country - with runner-up Christian Fox earning £150.’
      • ‘There are many ways in which mine host is like this city of concrete around him.’
      • ‘This was certainly the case at the Au Bon Coin Restaurant in Soi 5, where mine host Jose held a sampling party for the new release.’
      • ‘The presentation of the Mug was made this month by mine host Bjarne's boss, his wife Songkran, to whom thanks go for making the presentation.’
      • ‘In division one Bruce ‘The Quiet One’ Lawrence had a net 73, coming third behind the joint winners Bill Hewitt and mine host Mr. Loy, both of whom played to par.’
      • ‘Following the break (excellent toasted bacon sandwiches provided by mine host Ted Hughes), the visitors fielded the very strong pairing of Andy and Cris to take on Les and Dao.’
      • ‘I remained at the bar and had another glass of warm beer, in the long interludes of silence making desultory conversation with mine host.’
      • ‘The champagne has been flowing well into the early hours and it's not just to celebrate mine host's birthday.’
      • ‘There were many UK accents to be heard, including that of mine host Bobby, who with partner Pat, had taken over this side of the hotel just one month ago.’
      • ‘What makes Scooby's different on a Sunday afternoon is the English pub atmosphere generated largely by the fine free barbeque laid on by mine host from 2.30 p.m. to 6 p.m.’
      • ‘Inside, brass plaques still warn of the penalties of under-age drinking and the whereabouts of the conveniences, and mine host serves welcoming tea and coffee from behind a stout wooden bar.’
      • ‘But the smile of mine host, and his friendly banter, makes up for any forced journeys.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French hoste, from Latin hospes, hospit- ‘host, guest’.

Pronunciation

host

/həʊst/

Main definitions of host in English

: host1host2host3

host2

noun

  • 1a host/hosts ofA large number of people or things.

    ‘a host of memories rushed into her mind’
    • ‘There are a host of other issues around that as well.’
    • ‘The World Toilet Summit in Beijing will feature a host of guest speakers from across the globe discussing the latest toilet technology.’
    • ‘The club organised a host of money-making events, including raffles, bring and buy and car boot sales, and undertook each stage of the work as they raised enough money.’
    • ‘The former dictator faces a host of war crime charges.’
    • ‘There will be live music throughout the day, a fun fare, bouncing castle, tug of war, sheaf throwing and a whole host of entertainment.’
    • ‘For the U.S. media, the story presented a host of problems.’
    • ‘For 12 years of her Met Office career, she has provided forecasts on a host of BBC television and radio channels.’
    • ‘The evening will also feature storytelling and music led by Jim Kearney and friends, with a host of entertaining songs and stories on the agenda.’
    • ‘I have a host of acquaintances, a myriad of contacts, but no one besides Lucas I can call a real friend.’
    • ‘Revellers were greeted by funfair rides, stalls and a whole host of other entertainments on one of the hottest days of the year so far when they reached the park.’
    • ‘A host of entertainment is laid on over the weekend.’
    • ‘The fun and frolics continued on stage as Silly Billy the Clown and his sidekick Candy Floss kept the kids entertained with a host of hilarious antics.’
    • ‘It all throws up a host of memories for anyone who went to Berlin pre-1990.’
    • ‘The score also includes a host of popular Italian songs from days gone by.’
    • ‘The bags are also useful for a host of other things.’
    • ‘The evening will include a meal and a traditional music disco with a host of celebrity guests from the worlds of sport, entertainment and the national media.’
    • ‘Face painters, street entertainers and a host of displays gave visitors young and old the opportunity to have fun and find out more about the borough council.’
    • ‘The agenda is still being compiled but there will be a host of guest speakers.’
    • ‘That is why he formed the Delhi Automative Racing Association and help organise a host of national level events in the past.’
    • ‘Listen out for his new album due out shortly which will feature guest appearances by a host of well known acts including Brendan Grace and Isla Grant.’
    multitude, myriad, lot, large number, great quantity, score, abundance, wealth, flood, profusion, array
    crowd, throng, pack, band, flock, herd, drove, swarm, troop, horde, mob, army, legion, crush, press
    View synonyms
  • 2archaic An army.

    • ‘If he had the ring, he could command a great army and drive away the hosts of Mordor.’
    • ‘Will a great host of heaven, a great army of angels, accompany the Messiah at His Return?’
    • ‘So he merely stood on the wall above the gate, watching his army take on the host of elves.’
    • ‘But they all hoped he would appear at any moment, complete with a host of angels at his back, and deliver them from their captivity.’
    • ‘Suddenly a host of angels appeared with swords drawn.’
  • 3the host" or "the heavenly host(in biblical use) the angels regarded collectively.

    See also "lord of hosts" at lord
    • ‘The prayers of believers here on earth are mingled with the worship of angels and archangels and all the host of heaven, in adoration of God and the Lamb.’
    1. 3.1 The sun, moon, and stars.
      ‘the starry host of heaven’
  • 4rare A flock of sparrows.

    ‘there was a host of sparrows under the roof of the house’
    • ‘A single robin, pecking about on the garden step for his breakfast, will scatter a host of sparrows.’
    • ‘Stanford's roster included a golden eagle, a northern harrier, and a California thrasher, plus a host of sparrows.’
    • ‘They were met by a host of sparrows.’
    • ‘Such a host of sparrows twitter that it reminds one more of a stream joyful sound than of a compound of little utterances.’
    • ‘A host of sparrows create such a rioting as renders sleep or repose perfectly out of the question.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French ost, hoost, from Latin hostis ‘stranger, enemy’ (in medieval Latin ‘army’).

Pronunciation

host

/həʊst/

Main definitions of host in English

: host1host2host3

host3

noun

the Host
  • The bread consecrated in the Eucharist.

    ‘the elevation of the Host’
    • ‘Others were made of crystal, enabling the Host to be seen.’
    • ‘In the National Gallery's Mass of Saint Giles, for example, the saint elevates the Host at the moment of consecration.’
    • ‘The point of the elevation was to allow the faithful to adore the already consecrated Host.’
    • ‘The unhappy woman had hidden the Host in her veil after receiving.’
    • ‘Over the years candles were added to the tree along with round cookies - shaped like the Host - as symbols of the Redemption.’
    • ‘Later, rows over the nature of the Host plunged Europe into almost permanent warfare for nearly three centuries.’
    • ‘In response to his ‘Amen,’ I lean forward to place the Host on his tongue.’
    • ‘I have never seen or heard the Host so referred to in the context of the Mass.’
    • ‘The deacons will substitute for priests at weekend ceremonies of readings and prayers, but will not be able to consecrate the Host.’
    • ‘He placed a miniscule piece of the Host on her tongue.’
    • ‘Nothing was too large: the composition of the Host in the mass; the conduct of priests.’
    • ‘He held the Host and then the chalice high for a solid minute.’
    • ‘And so another parishioner and I took our Host, and broke it, and gave it to the Aboriginal girls.’
    • ‘He encouraged devotion to the Host as well as daily almsgiving.’
    • ‘Wirth adds that the rise in Last Judgment imagery occurs not coincidentally at a time when the profanation of the Host becomes a concern of zealous clerics.’
    • ‘Only direct contact with the Holiest of items, The Host, The Cross, and Holy water, will suffice to repel her.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French hoiste, from Latin hostia ‘victim’.

Pronunciation

host

/həʊst/