Definition of hop in (or out) in English:

hop in (or out)

phrasal verb

informal
  • Get into (or out of) a vehicle.

    ‘hop in then and we'll be off’
    • ‘It begins in a cab, with Campbell playing the haunted driver spotting a woman on the street who, after a long deliberation, hops in.’
    • ‘You can charge around on foot with rifles, or hop in any number of vehicles to indulge in some mechanised ultra-violence.’
    • ‘No longer will prospective drivers have to trek down to the state's Motor Vehicle Division office to get their eyes assessed before hopping in a car to take the rest of the test.’
    • ‘First thing I really observed was how very much closer these places are when you're on your own, when it's simply a matter of hopping in the car and going there.’
    • ‘How many times do you see people loading their kids into their cars, closing the doors, hopping in themselves, and then lighting a cigarette?’
    • ‘I continued to fight the temper-tantrum urge and resisted honking my horn or hopping out of the car to throw rocks at the train.’
    • ‘‘It sounded like a backfire - and then somebody hooted and shouted to me to hop out of the vehicle as it was on fire,’ she said.’
    • ‘One motorist headed toward Texas gestures to the car behind him to go around, if necessary, as he hops out and into a storefront.’
    • ‘Davis and Karen Love, both 60, stood on the pier and remembered hopping in their car and driving down to Brevard County for a night launch.’
    • ‘Uncle Sam pulled the truck to a stop near the barn, hopping out and waving the other two vehicles toward him.’
    • ‘Instead of driving to the new hot spot or hopping out of their cars to do foot patrols, some uniform cops used the program as an excuse to idle in their cruisers.’
    • ‘It's just a matter of hopping in the car and taking the spin into the ‘big smoke’.’
    • ‘There is a mad scramble with people hopping in and out every time a bus stops.’
    • ‘I would love to be hopping out of my car right now to an uncrowded surf session at a break just like the one on the entry page to the site.’
    • ‘She then hops in a cab to Heathrow, jumps on the 5.30 pm British Airways flight to JFK and taxis into Manhattan in time for supper at the Upper West Side apartment of her financier fiancé, Ivan.’
    • ‘Deb gets annoyed, hops in a cab home, and writes him off.’
    • ‘I'm a little wary of hopping in my car and trying to drive long distances because then you do run the risk of meeting up with them.’
    • ‘So if he has a job in Naas, he hops in the helicopter and flies there from Galway.’
    • ‘Needless to say, I'm now glad of the practice. I've thus been hopping in the car for an hour or so each day and driving around the place.’
    • ‘The prince nodded, hopping out of the vehicle and sauntering around to the back.’