Main definitions of hood in English

: hood1hood2hood3

hood1

noun

  • 1A covering for the head and neck with an opening for the face, typically forming part of a coat or cloak.

    ‘a jacket with a detachable hood’
    • ‘She was dressed in a dark cloak, with the hood pulled over her head.’
    • ‘‘Cool,’ she said as she put on a coat with a hood and started walking towards the door.’
    • ‘Besides, she had a black wig, black sunglasses, and a black coat with a hood.’
    • ‘A man in a dark cloak with a hood stood beneath the trees.’
    • ‘On the rare occasions he has been out in Glasgow's city centre after dark, he has been wearing a duffel coat with a huge hood to hide him from unfriendly eyes.’
    • ‘The figure wore a black cloak with the hood pulled over his or her face, making it impossible for the young man to see any distinct features.’
    • ‘They wore duffel coats with the hoods up.’
    • ‘He stood there in a black trench coat with a black hood over his face.’
    • ‘They all wore cloaks with the hoods low on their faces.’
    • ‘The Ku Klux Klan, founded in the United States in 1866, wore white hoods and cloaks and carried burning crosses to terrorise people as part of their white supremacy policy.’
    • ‘Today it was a long black trench coat with a hood that shaded his face from view.’
    • ‘Right in front of her was a group people in cloaks, their hoods pulled over their faces to hide themselves, no doubt.’
    • ‘Snow was starting to settle on her shoulders and on the top of the hood of her coat.’
    • ‘Ignoring the name, I slipped on the coat and tugged the hood over my face.’
    • ‘When he checked the scene, he discovered the body of an elderly woman, dressed in a dark, oilskin coat with the hood up.’
    • ‘He stepped back into the snow, putting the hood of the coat over his head.’
    • ‘I put my coat on and my hood up so the police officer wouldn't recognize me.’
    • ‘The attacker, whose face was covered by a hood, grabbed her from behind in the dark alley.’
    • ‘I had bought a cloak that had a hood so I could hide my face.’
    • ‘He wore a baseball cap, light-coloured jogging bottoms, trainers and a big woolly duffel-type coat with a hood.’
    • ‘The man with the gun, clad from head to toe in black clothing and wearing a balaclava underneath the hood of his coat, asked for money.’
    head covering, cowl, snood, scarf, head scarf
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A large hood-shaped piece of fabric, typically trimmed with fur or a similar material, worn over the shoulders of a university gown or a surplice to indicate the wearer's degree.
      • ‘Excited graduates walk up and down, parading their finery of gowns, hoods and mortarboards seemingly oblivious to the fact that these are colonial trappings.’
      • ‘During the afternoon ceremony, master's degrees were conferred on 510 new graduates wearing brightly colored hoods denoting their major.’
      • ‘It was Graduation day at de Montfort on Thursday, with hundreds of young people wearing their gowns and colourful hoods, and dozens of doting parents taking pictures.’
    2. 1.2Sport
      A leather covering for a hawk's head.
      • ‘There is a falcon hood - the brown leather dome, crowned with a tuft of feathers, is brittle like a little skull - and an envelope contains a watch.’
      • ‘Hoods are used to keep the bird calm during transport.’
      • ‘It's the same principal falconers use when they put a hood over a falcon's head.’
  • 2A thing resembling a hood in shape or use, in particular.

    • ‘The upper lip, consisting of two fused petals, covers the pistils and stamens like a hood.’
    • ‘So we really don't want to open the hood of the car.’
    • ‘A chemical fume hood is located in the main room.’
    • ‘Treatment involves repair of the extensor hood with relocation of the extensor tendon.’
    • ‘He kept a sawed-off shotgun in his trench coat and often stowed several ounces of meth under the hood of his car.’
    • ‘Have you ever seen a dog jump onto the hood of a moving car?!’
    • ‘Air deflectors installed in front of a vehicle's hood are also often designed to match the style of the vehicle's bumper.’
    • ‘This can be achieved by allowing access through existing ventilation slits, louvres and hoods to self-contained nesting areas kept separate from the rest of the interior.’
    • ‘However, the external hood does nothing for boot space, which isno better than in a car where the hood does steal from the luggage compartment.’
    • ‘The charmer then makes rhythmic, elegant motions with the horn, which is correspondingly followed by the hood of the cobra.’
    • ‘He had processed a patient's bacterial culture without a safety hood.’
    • ‘Remind your customer - and yourself - that the first time she bought a car she didn't know anything about what was under the hood.’
    • ‘Even with the hood open, taller people will have problems as their heads will be in the air stream.’
    • ‘When we were trying to teach him to drive he kept getting out and attempting to climb on the hood of the truck.’
    • ‘Fume hoods in the labs provide weak suction, preventing researchers from using toxic chemicals.’
    • ‘In case of rain, they can be made very effective as impervious hoods or umbrellas.’
    • ‘Practice under the hood in good weather to do the hard stuff.’
    • ‘The watch manager with Norfolk Fire Service, said: "The can of deodorant was left near the cooker hood in the kitchen.’
    • ‘I hit the frontside of his car and stopped just short of going over the hood.’
    • ‘Hoping for a procession of migrating raptors, I stretched out on the hood of my car.’
    1. 2.1British A folding waterproof cover of a car, pram, etc.
      • ‘If the toy you choose has a clip, it will enable you to attach it to the front of the pram hood above the baby's head.’
      • ‘One drawback about the folding hard top is that you can't get luggage out when the hood is folded down.’
    2. 2.2North American The bonnet of a motor vehicle.
      • ‘The small electronic parts under the hood and in the dashboard are especially susceptible to water damage.’
      • ‘The front and rear bumper beams are aluminum, as are the hood and the wagon's tailgate.’
      • ‘I leaned across the hood of the vehicle and gazed through the tinted windshield.’
      • ‘Parts of the vehicle, including the hood and bumper, were found 45 metres down the road.’
      • ‘For example, aluminum is used for the hood, front and rear bumper beams, and rear suspension knuckle.’
      • ‘The front hood of John's jeep was seriously dented and crushed in.’
      • ‘Our hood was crumpled and the fender was dented, but the engine continued to run.’
      • ‘The engine is installed at a low angle in the vehicle leaving the hood more than three inches of deformation space before it hits the engine.’
      • ‘Ever since I picked up my car from the mechanic the other day, there's been a rather irritating noise emanating from under the hood.’
      • ‘Josh was leaning against the front hood of his black BMW, Jamie leaning out the window on the right side.’
      • ‘The body panels, including the doors, the fenders, the hood and the tailgate are of course among the most vulnerable.’
      • ‘She screamed as she toppled onto the hood of the still-advancing vehicle.’
      • ‘When she didn't move, he crossed in front of the hood and opened her door for her.’
      • ‘He laughed, and Kim followed him back past the cars with hoods up and tires removed.’
      • ‘He was able to break free of Adrian's grasp and jump up onto the hood of the vehicle.’
      • ‘From hoods to hubcaps, mirrors to spoilers and even wheels, these cars feature a sleek design combined with affordable pricing.’
      • ‘One person actually rolled over the hood and got caught between the hood and windshield.’
      • ‘She had just turned the key in the ignition when there was a loud bang as something landed on the front hood of the truck.’
      • ‘The roof was caved in, the passenger side was crushed, the windshield was blown out and the hood was twisted and distorted.’
      • ‘Aside from giving your car a new look, swapping hoods and other body parts can help your vehicle run more smoothly and faster.’
    3. 2.3A canopy to protect users of machinery or to remove fumes from it.
      • ‘The primary purpose of a laboratory hood is to keep toxic or irritating vapors and fumes out of the general laboratory working area.’
      • ‘In the real case, it is likely that combustion products would have been removed by the extraction hood, even after the fan had failed.’
      • ‘Heavy insulation of the tank and hood helps maintain operating temperature and reduce energy requirements.’
      • ‘And all range hoods require occasional cleaning or replacing of the grease-covered metal filters.’
      • ‘Range hoods and fans remove grease and moisture from cooking, and so collect dirt.’
      • ‘When using a large apparatus inside the hood, place the equipment on blocks, when safe and practical, to allow air flow beneath it.’
      • ‘Many extractor hoods have lights, which can be useful for spotlighting your hob.’
      • ‘For example, on most bath fans and kitchen exhaust hoods, the damper is located on the housing of the fan unit, right at the point where the vent pipe attaches to the housing.’
      • ‘The rooms appear to have been used for some sort of scientific purpose - there are special fountains for washing eyes, and ventilation hoods in every lab.’
    4. 2.4A hood-like structure or marking on the head or neck of an animal.
      ‘the hood of a rearing cobra’
      • ‘To ward off trouble, cobras can rear up, and they have hoods that expand out like a half umbrella to make themselves appear bigger and scarier than they actually are.’
      • ‘In breeding plumage, the adult has a dark hood with a black eye and bill.’
    5. 2.5The upper part of the flower of a plant such as a dead-nettle.
      • ‘White spots on the hood may be absent or occur in patches.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Put a hood on or over.

    ‘she was forced into a car, hooded, and taken to a cell’
    • ‘These sources say the prisoners there are hooded from the moment they are captured.’
    • ‘Basically they kicked down his door, rifled through his things, hooded him, and dragged him away.’
    • ‘He said the accused had also known she would recognise him so he added to her trauma by hooding himself, and to make sure he was not seen, had thrown a towel over her head.’
    • ‘The men were hooded and handcuffed and taken to a former torture centre.’
    • ‘From the moment they are captured, prisoners are hooded, shackled and accorded no rights whatsoever.’
    • ‘In Camp Delta, this means shackling inmates for 20 hours a day, while hooding and beating them.’

Origin

Old English hōd, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch hoed, German Hut hat, also to hat.

Pronunciation:

hood

/hʊd/

Main definitions of hood in English

: hood1hood2hood3

hood2

noun

North american
informal
  • A gangster or similar violent criminal.

    ‘I been beaten up by hoods’
    • ‘The Pepper Street gang, of which Jackie was the acknowledged leader, was not a gang of drug-selling hoods.’
    • ‘He has gone into hiding and a peculiarly Jamaican chaos has erupted as everyone - police, local yardies and hoods from afar - are after him, trying to track him down.’
    • ‘The police speak of a rising tide of knife crime, where everyone from misguided schoolkids to inner-city hoods are apparently arming themselves with flick knives, pen knives, machetes and swords.’
    • ‘On the other side of this pending transaction Rocky's heavy handed hoods were less than enthusiastic about doing business with operators like them.’
    • ‘This British crime drama tracks a group of young hoods who try to swindle local crime boss Dad Savage.’
    • ‘When it comes to robbing us blind, the Armani-clad criminals in corporate boardrooms have it all over the hoods on the street.’
    • ‘It's a film that focuses on ethics, be they pure or prurient, and how criminals and hoods can still require a sense of justice and fair play.’
    • ‘But his violent past finally catches up with the hood turned husband and father in this rumination on America's predatory predilection to use force.’
    • ‘They look like mafia hoods and molls - all grey hair, badly fitting dark suits and chin stubble.’
    • ‘Time and again, in areas where hardened hoods tread warily, I see lost tourists in leisurewear by Tommy Hilfiger and accessories by Gucci.’
    • ‘It's also a gangster film more interested in innocent bystanders than hoods or the police who chase them.’
    • ‘It's a great honour to street hoods who slave away, pulling off heists so the upper bosses can get a cut of the profits, but to me it's just another society.’
    • ‘His connections to senior criminal organisations and well-placed hoods are known to police.’
    • ‘In this Golden Age, the heroes were neither cops nor outlaws, doctors nor housekeepers, ranch-owners nor lawyers, spies nor mafia hoods.’
    • ‘She also is fascinated by the hoods and low-lifes that Nick looks up as he meanders his way through the task of finding Clyde Wynant.’
    • ‘They all look like hoods and he knows they will be hoods their whole lives.’
    • ‘Up and Down opens with a couple of hoods smuggling a truckload of Indian refugees into the Czech Republic.’
    • ‘At the two minute mark, the first action scene begins as hoods try to carjack Will Smith's Porsche.’

Origin

1930s: abbreviation of hoodlum.

Pronunciation:

hood

/hʊd/

Main definitions of hood in English

: hood1hood2hood3

hood3

(also 'hood)

noun

US
informal
  • A neighbourhood, especially one in an urban area.

    ‘I've lived in the hood for 15 years’
    • ‘You might not have a hood, but you will always have neighbors.’
    • ‘I also included a few other pics of places that are changing, or opening in the hood…’
    • ‘And after mentioning last week that we had thieves in the hood they came back again.’
    • ‘They had ghastly visions of the boys in the hood heading for their neighborhoods next.’
    • ‘Check them out, and if they play live in your hood go see them, you won't be disappointed.’
    • ‘He cruises the hood in a BMW.’
    • ‘Eventually the idealistic plans of keeping peace in the hood morphed into a criminal element never seen before in Los Angeles.’
    • ‘And if you're in the hood, make sure to come to the fabulous party tomorrow night.’
    • ‘I love the lack of pretense in East Boston, which is why now I still visit the old hood because it's still home.’
    • ‘But to King's supporters, none of this justifies slashing services in the hood.’
    • ‘If you live in the hood, or are passing through Russian Hill and need to check mail on your laptop, Nook would be a worthy, comfortable place to stop.’

Origin

1970s: shortening of neighbourhood.

Pronunciation:

hood

/hʊd/