Main definitions of hooch in English

: hooch1hooch2

hooch1

(also hootch)

noun

informal
  • [mass noun] Alcoholic drink, especially inferior or illicit whisky.

    • ‘Sure, sitting around drinking bottles of hooch must seem like a great job.’
    • ‘Once considered a low class hooch, tequila has undergone a huge image change over the past two decades to become the toast of Mexican high society, giving a heady euphoria to the country's drinks industry.’
    • ‘Like the boozer who just spent a glorious 28 days kept away from hooch in rehab, you'll eventually be thrust into the so-called real world, where you'll have to use whatever coping skills you learned in seclusion.’
    • ‘Two booze barons are shipping in illegal hooch to the village in the boots of their cars and selling it to youngsters at knock-down prices.’
    • ‘That night, they held an impromptu party on the river's edge, where friends and friends of friends partied into the wee hours, drinking home-brewed orange hooch and saying farewell.’
    • ‘Make him promise he's going to spend it on hooch.’
    • ‘Most members of a corporation's ‘leadership team’ take a dim view of hooch.’
    • ‘The judge threw the case out of court when it was proved they were all down and outs who could barely afford a bottle of cheap hooch let alone a pint of delicious, creamy Guinness.’
    • ‘Safety is a key concern, so although the council has granted an abundance of late licenses to clubs serving discount hooch, it has also recently designated certain public areas as no drink zones.’
    • ‘I'm not one to shy away from making my own form of hooch, and this stuff fits that description nicely.’
    • ‘I took the hint and cut back on the hooch, and pretty soon the headache faded.’
    • ‘The government hopes that while some people continue to make hooch illegally to avoid taxes, many like Saul will see the benefit of running a licensed business that will allow them to market their product more widely.’
    • ‘He was the son of a part-time prostitute and lived part of his younger days in a spare room on the top floor of a Bourbon Street whorehouse, where hooch became an integral part of his life.’
    • ‘The Government was also forced to admit that illicit hooch was being brewed in Aarey colony, a reserve forest area in the city.’
    • ‘So, you've put down your deposit on your speakeasy and you're ready to start pouring the hooch, right?’
    • ‘I went to my desk and got my bottle of hooch from the drawer.’
    • ‘But unless you've got someone to guide you safely back to your welcoming bed, steer clear of the local hooch - ouzo - the Greek spirit flavoured with aniseed consumed diluted with water.’
    • ‘The visit went smoothly enough, but Rock spent most of it knocking back hooch, then piled the girls into the car and tried to drive them home, passing in and out of consciousness.’
    liquor, intoxicating liquor, alcoholic drink, strong drink, drink, spirits, intoxicants
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation of Hoochinoo, the name of an Alaskan Indian people who made liquor.

Pronunciation

hooch

/huːtʃ/

Main definitions of hooch in English

: hooch1hooch2

hooch2

noun

US
informal
  • A shelter or improvised dwelling.

    • ‘The school supplies and toys were piling up so much that we were running out of room in our hooch.’
    • ‘Why would I give all that up to live in a hooch and eat cafeteria food for a year?’
    • ‘Even worse, there was a direct hit on a nearby hooch.’
    • ‘But ongoing construction will replace 270 hooches with no indoor plumbing with 44 four-unit apartment buildings and seven two-story, 72-occupant dormitories.’
    • ‘The hooches are 12 wooden huts where airmen live.’

Origin

1950s (originally military slang): perhaps from Japanese uchi dwelling.

Pronunciation

hooch

/huːtʃ/