Definition of Homeric in English:

Homeric

adjective

  • 1Relating to or in the style of Homer or the epic poems ascribed to him.

    • ‘Anaxagoras, too, explained the Homeric poems as discussions of virtue and justice.’
    • ‘Courage was the defining virtue of the Homeric hero, and Aristotle evidently loved heroic courage above all.’
    • ‘He does all the great things of the Homeric heroes: he wages war; gets lost at sea; and travels to the underworld.’
    • ‘He linked himself to the Homeric story, creating the foremost literary monument of European modernism, Ulysses.’
    • ‘Projecting onto Homeric poetry the aesthetic principles of classicism, she wanted its perfection of form and content always to be emphasized.’
    • ‘Much more recently, Harold Bloom has written eloquently on the Homeric qualities of Tolstoy's last novel, ‘Hadji Murad’.’
    • ‘She praises the discerning sensibility of the Homeric characters.’
    • ‘Through the centuries the Homeric epics have influenced writers and philosophers of many different countries.’
    • ‘Brann describes the Homeric simile as a kind of rapture.’
    • ‘Perhaps classical scholars will wince, but putting a personal spin on history couldn't be more Homeric.’
    • ‘Wood also objects to the way Rushdie's characters remind us of their likeness to Greek and Indian mythical heroes, unlike Joyce's characters who do not know they are Homeric.’
    • ‘Virgil was an epic poet in the Homeric tradition, with his Aeneid telling the story of a survivor from Troy.’
    • ‘Although of dubious value as social history, Asbury's gang genealogy of Manhattan is unquestionably wonderful storytelling - an urban counterpart to the Homeric epic or Icelandic saga.’
    • ‘Feasting plays a central role in the Homeric epics.’
    • ‘Through its association with the Apollo and Orpheus myths and with the Homeric epics the lyre was accorded high status in Greek and Roman society.’
    • ‘Whereas for us the Homeric epics are literature, and the Bible can be read as literature, Western readers tend not to turn to the Koran unless their object is to learn about Islam.’
    • ‘In this respect, aspects of the Homeric terminology that relate to feasting are particularly interesting.’
    • ‘However, in contrast to the Homeric poems, where the actions of mythical heroes provided lessons for human behaviour, tragedy does not yield easy answers.’
    • ‘And all the well-informed Greeks knew these Homeric legends, which were actually history, as well as being legends.’
    • ‘Summarizing Homer's superior beauties in a few striking pages, she unveils a genuine understanding of the Homeric text.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to Bronze Age Greece as described in the Homeric poems:
      ‘the mists of the Homeric age’
      • ‘And in the same way we find lots of similarities between Vedic religion and the religion of the Homeric Greeks.’
      • ‘Assume that a smith of the Homeric age has fashioned two suits of copper armor and wants to exchange them for copper, fuel, and food.’
      • ‘The crux of this issue rests on whether or not there are sufficient similarities in the structures of Mycenaean and Homeric society to warrant comparison.’
      • ‘Since for the Greeks of the Homeric age existence on its barest terms would have been intolerable, they showed a heroic artistic instinct in turning their battle-bound lives into a spectacle.’
      • ‘Our beginning is Greece, Homeric Greece perhaps.’
    2. 1.2 Epic and large-scale:
      ‘some of us exert a Homeric effort’
      • ‘One report described the goal as Homeric.’
      • ‘That's a Homeric achievement in a strongman contest, where events are designed to test pressing, hoisting, pulling, pushing and crushing power, combined with full-body strength, all of which take years to develop.’
      • ‘And now it's going to be a Homeric victory when the voters return Evan to office.’
      • ‘As for the celebratory dishes they are almost of Homeric proportions and some of them little known elsewhere in Greece.’
      epic, large-scale, grand, monumental, vast, heroic, impressive, imposing
      View synonyms

Origin

Via Latin from Greek Homērikos, from Homēros (see Homer).

Pronunciation:

Homeric

/həʊˈmɛrɪk/