Main definitions of hock in English

: hock1hock2hock3hock4

hock1

noun

  • 1The joint in a quadruped's hind leg between the knee and the fetlock, the angle of which points backwards.

    • ‘These are worn on the hocks and protect the horse from injuries.’
    • ‘Their manes and tails are trimmed evenly, never wrapped and always comfortably cut just above the hocks.’
    • ‘The cover wrapped around its entire body, only hocks showing.’
    • ‘He had exceptional conformation, very correct legs, hocks, and knees.’
    • ‘He had a sad little tail, barely long enough to brush his hocks.’
    • ‘The six-year-old, below, has strained a hock and, while O'Brien says the injury is only slight, he adds that the gelding will probably be left for the rest of the season.’
    • ‘The sun was slanting back into the west once more as they stood on a firm-packed beach, waves washing about the hocks of Brandark's horse and Bahzell's calves, and looked out across a hundred yards of sea at a small island.’
    • ‘The ten-year-old daughter of that horse crashed into a fence and developed an infection deep in her hock.’
    • ‘He bolted, trying to get away from the snake that was nipping at his hocks.’
    • ‘These diseases can affect the shoulder, elbow, knee, or hock joints in animals.’
    • ‘‘You can still see some marks on his left hock,’ Johnson said.’
    • ‘Amazingly though, after recovering from a delicate operation to repair the tendon which slipped off one of his rear hocks, Teeton Mill is in line for a remarkable racing comeback at Ascot next Saturday.’
    • ‘It primarily occurs in the shoulder or elbow joints, but it can affect the hocks or stifles, too.’
    • ‘Time and again, I have horses presented for sore back problems but in fact it is their hocks that are aching.’
    • ‘The giant breeds - those that weigh 12 pounds or more - should be kept in cages with solid floors to prevent sore hocks.’
    • ‘You put your thumb on its hock and bend its leg backward until it's hyper-extended, while you close your hand around its leg at the thigh.’
    • ‘My mare rolled over and over in the wet grass and was playful with the gelding, nipping at his hocks and tempting him to chase her.’
    • ‘The hocks and elbows of your dog should receive special attention.’
    • ‘Timboroa finally returned in the Turf Classic on September 29, but finished last of eight after injuring a ligament in a hock.’
    • ‘Marcia said, ‘It was winter, and he was in caked pasture mud up to his hocks and had long hair’, but she liked him.’
  • 2A knuckle of meat, especially of pork or ham.

    • ‘While wandering around the village we found several restaurants serving fish and an amazing place that smoked fish and cheese and hocks of ham, and you could watch them doing it.’
    • ‘The butchers had belly of pork, breast of lamb, brisket of beef, neck of lamb, offal such as liver and heart, and hock of bacon.’
    • ‘The menu is regularly updated, but pork hock with fruit compôte, or seared salmon with a chilled raspberry vinaigrette, are perennial favourites.’
    • ‘If neighbors had a Thanksgiving turkey, the Witherses told everyone they did, too, even if their holiday dinner was ham hocks and beans.’
    • ‘Use a smoked gammon knuckle, smoked ham hock or whatever smoked bacon bones you can find - or talk your butcher into selling you the ham bone when they get to the end of carving off the meat.’
    • ‘We wolfed down fabulous hamburgers, ham hocks, duck and pints of ale, though Soames astonishingly stuck to Diet Coke and no dessert.’
    • ‘If you wish, add the meat from the hock and season with salt and pepper.’
    • ‘Although a hock, which weighs up to a kilo, is mostly skin, bone and gristle, it will also yield 200g of moist bacon meat, which can be added to soup or used in a salad.’
    • ‘I had the black bean soup with smoked ham hock.’
    • ‘Remove the ham hock, and slice off meat from the bone.’
    • ‘If using bacon bones or hocks, remove the fat, chop the meat and return to pot.’
    • ‘Don't forget to buy some pumpkin pie, roast duck and pork hock to take home with you.’
    • ‘Reduce the heat and simmer gently, uncovered, for 2 hours until the ham hock is cooked.’
    • ‘Remove the ham hock, de-bone, dice, and add to the base.’
    • ‘Larger pieces of bacon, or bacon hocks, boiled and served hot or cold with mustard, were much used as standby dishes in poorer households.’
    • ‘It was the best pea soup I'd ever had, filled with hocks and so smoky, but in a good way.’
    • ‘I said I doubted whether Andy would be able to stay for tea, having no wish to inflict Peg's famous boiled bacon hock, or her philosophy, on any of my friends.’
    • ‘Add the chicken stock, fish stock, and ham hock, maintain at a simmer, and set aside.’
    • ‘A pressed slab of ham hock and foie gras were correct enough and their accompanying home-made piccalilli was bravely sour.’
    • ‘Reports speak of plates piled high with hundreds of tiny fish, eaten with brown bread and the best hock.’

Origin

Late Middle English: variant of hough.

Pronunciation

hock

/hɒk/

Main definitions of hock in English

: hock1hock2hock3hock4

hock2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • Deposit (an object) with a pawnbroker as security for money lent.

    • ‘No longer do you have to hock your car, mortgage your house and sell your firstborn child just to afford your supplements.’
    • ‘A young woman follows her suicidal boy friend to a pawn shop and finds out he has just hocked her fur coat to buy a handgun.’
    • ‘As a matter of fact, the luckiest thing about it is that, if I ever had to, I could hock it’.’
    • ‘The archives has the pawn ticket he received when he hocked his binoculars in 1954 for fifteen dollars.’
    • ‘We are pretty much the pimps of capitalism, hocking the wares of whoever shows us the money.’
    • ‘Then there were the working class and lower class who would all be crowded into the third part of the train, all having had to hock much of their possessions to even make the passage.’
    • ‘In a state of financial desperation, the camera captures Christophe hocking his musical instruments, the things he loves the most.’
    • ‘And though every sign in her life seems to be telling her she can't go to the contest, she begs, borrows and steals - even hocks her mother's diamond engagement ring - to get herself to Florida to compete.’
    • ‘You'll know all about it when I hock the microwave!’
    • ‘The CIA man was creeped out, but he knew he could hock the watch for 10 bucks, probably to the same crook that sold it to the squid.’
    • ‘And everywhere, stores seem to be offering items that help us connect to other worlds without having to hock grandma's silver.’
    • ‘The enlisted servicemen and women hock stuff in the pawn shops and borrow against payday.’
    • ‘They had concerns at the time that Herd would hock the cup for drinking money.’
    • ‘It is important for the narrative's subtextual meaning that she gives him her wedding ring to hock for money to buy the heroin.’
    • ‘For those who don't remember, Portman had to hock everything to build his One Peachtree masterpiece.’
    • ‘With all the hi-tech digital tools available, new filmmakers are finding they can create cinema without hocking their homes or putting their day jobs on hold.’
    • ‘Feeling guilty about owing the kindly journalist for her fare, she hocks a valuable Balzac first edition for 180,000 francs and pays her debt.’
    • ‘Back to Oceanside. The enlisted servicemen and women hock stuff in the pawn shops and borrow against payday.’
    • ‘In 1898, U.S. Open champion Fred Herd, a renowned boozer, was asked to leave a deposit on the championship cup, because officials were afraid he'd hock it.’
    • ‘When he can't take the pressures of his dying brother any more, he hocks his father's most expensive watch so he can buy a hit of heroin.’
    • ‘And thus, I had to cash in bonds, break the piggy banks and hock jewelry to get the necessary supplies.’
    • ‘Looks like he hocked some of our stuff and used the money.’
    cripple, lame, disable, handicap, injure
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • in hock

    • 1informal Having been pawned.

      ‘the family jewels are in hock already’
      • ‘But, unlike pawnshops in most countries, the real business is a steady stream of people putting their homes in hock.’
      • ‘In Washington, antiques, glasses and brassbound telescopes that had been in hock for decades are being snapped up by a rush of buyers.’
      • ‘Worse: rather than being self-denying while you retrain for more lucrative employment, should you put the contents of your workshop in hock and live it up at the nearest Ritz-Carlton?’
      1. 1.1In debt.
        ‘the women were in hock to extortionate moneylenders’
        • ‘There is evidence that some will even get in hock with illegal money lenders, which can have truly disastrous consequences.’
        • ‘Irrespective of who is elected they will be in hock to their contributors.’
        • ‘In other words they are in hock to the government, who control their spending.’
        • ‘Wouldn't there be a danger of the hospital getting itself in hock to the private sector?’
        • ‘Because it doesn't depend on heavy machinery, this farm, unlike most, isn't in hock to the bank’.’
        • ‘That story had a happier ending than many closer to home where families get in hock to the tune of thousands of euro.’
        • ‘Millions of the less well-off are in hock to money lenders because banks won't handle their affairs since the profit margin involved isn't big enough.’
        • ‘The women were in hock to extortionate moneylenders.’
        • ‘Our most fertile citizens are constantly in hock to student loans and hired on contract rather than a full-time position.’
        • ‘‘I'm always in hock, because of the investment of time, energy, and money,’ she said to me.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (in the phrase in hock): from Dutch hok ‘hutch, prison, debt’.

Pronunciation

hock

/hɒk/

Main definitions of hock in English

: hock1hock2hock3hock4

hock3

noun

mass nounBritish
  • A dry white wine from the German Rhineland.

    • ‘Let’s have a glass of hock, shall we?’
    • ‘The head of a boisterous party of ex-public schoolboys calls over the waiter and asks for a bottle of hock.’
    • ‘This name being a bit of a tongue twister for the petite bourgeoisie who were immediately attracted to it, the truncated version, hock, became the name for every wine from the Rhine.’

Origin

Abbreviation of obsolete hockamore, alteration of German Hochheimer (Wein) ‘(wine) from Hochheim’.

Pronunciation

hock

/hɒk/

Main definitions of hock in English

: hock1hock2hock3hock4

hock4

noun

North American
  • variant spelling of hawk

Pronunciation

hock

/hɒk/