Definition of hippodrome in English:

hippodrome

noun

  • 1[as name] A theatre or concert hall:

    ‘the Birmingham Hippodrome’
    • ‘No horse races took place at the Palermo hippodrome in the City of Buenos Aires on August 24 and 25.’
    • ‘The team has already run an F1 car around the Circus Maximus in Rome, and the historic Sultanahmet hippodrome in Istanbul's city centre.’
    playhouse, auditorium, amphitheatre, hippodrome, coliseum
    View synonyms
  • 2(in ancient Greece or Rome) a stadium for chariot or horse races.

    • ‘The most popular entertainments were the theater, frequently denounced by the clergy for nudity and immorality, and the races at the hippodrome.’
    • ‘About two miles away and once connected by an ancient colonnaded paved road is the largest existing Roman hippodrome found in the world.’
    • ‘Part of it was thrown into the hippodrome of the town, together with the Chakraswamin, an idol of bronze brought from Thanesar.’
    • ‘Both these treaties are shown on the base of the obelisk of Theodosius, erected in the hippodrome at Constantinople in 390, as triumphs of Roman arms.’
    • ‘We've studied the foundations of temples, hippodromes and harbours and our task was to rebuild them from the ruins using the latest technology.’
    • ‘But as in the conflicts between Blue and Green factions of the Byzantine hippodrome, minor affective preferences can have major political consequences.’
    • ‘Many of Herod's structures are well preserved - the palace, aqueduct, hippodrome, and the amphitheater.’
    • ‘Chariot races staged in the hippodrome - always a crowd-pleaser - opened the games.’
    • ‘The historic heart of Istanbul will welcome a parade of historic racing cars on the route of the ancient hippodrome.’
    stadium, arena, amphitheatre, coliseum, colosseum
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (in hippodrome): from French, via Latin from Greek hippodromos, from hippos horse + dromos race, course. The early sense led to the term's use as a grandiose name for a modern circus, later applied to other places of popular entertainment ( hippodrome, late 19th century).

Pronunciation

hippodrome

/ˈhɪpədrəʊm/