Definition of Hinglish in English:

Hinglish

noun

informal
  • [mass noun] A blend of Hindi and English, in particular a variety of English used by speakers of Hindi, characterized by frequent use of Hindi vocabulary or constructions.

    • ‘A lad in camouflage pants bounces around on a pink plastic sofa spouting Hinglish, Hindi-English pop talk.’
    • ‘Indian English is a much broader notion than Hinglish, applicable to the whole of India, including those regions where other languages are used.’
    • ‘Today Hinglish (English with Hindi words) or Pinglish (English with Punjabi words) is acceptable to a wide cross-section of people.’
    • ‘Entries can be sent in any language - Marathi, Gujarati, Hindi, Urdu and, of course, Hinglish.’
    • ‘The patrons came more on zippy two wheelers, wearing dungarees, talking a combination of Kannada, Hinglish, and English.’
    • ‘What I find particularly fascinating is that this new way of speaking, often referred to as Hinglish, is playing a growing role in advertising.’
    • ‘Here is a magazine article on a more code-switching version of Hinglish.’
    • ‘Research for the new edition of the Collins English Dictionary has revealed that Hinglish words are being increasingly used in English.’
    • ‘It is not the Stardust [magazine] kind of Hinglish, but a conscious take from Hindi film dialogues and popular TV commercials.’
    • ‘In this movie, important sequences of the film are in English - in fact, it's a Hinglish movie.’
    • ‘Today, when he speaks to a top-heavy group of foreign economists and analysts in a Hinglish patois there is no trace of embarrassment.’
    • ‘But ouch, there comes her boyfriend with a Hinglish tongue and a punkish plucky attitude.’
    • ‘After all, the Indians have introduced Hinglish, a mixture of Hindi and English!’
    • ‘The album has an international touch with techno-beats interspersed with Punjabi folk and a fair amount of Hinglish mixed with Punjabi lyrics.’
    • ‘Most Indians seem to enjoy using Hinglish and local attitudes towards imperfect English have changed.’
    • ‘In the long run, we can expect Hinglish to influence English in many fields, in the same way that Latin and French have over several centuries.’

Pronunciation:

Hinglish

/ˈhɪŋɡliʃ/