Definition of hijacking in English:

hijacking

noun

  • An act of illegally seizing an aircraft, vehicle, or ship while in transit; a hijack.

    ‘he was involved in a hijacking in 1981’
    [mass noun] ‘measures to prevent hijacking’
    • ‘The country has the highest number of murders, rapes, hijackings and violent robberies in the world.’
    • ‘So far from my mind were hijackings and terrorists with knives that I did not think anything of it.’
    • ‘When combined with a recent murder, car hijackings and muggings, the streets of this city are becoming increasingly dangerous.’
    • ‘The dead man was a known criminal with more than 40 previous convictions, including armed robbery and car hijackings.’
    • ‘That occurred at the Munich Olympics and in a lot of aircraft hijackings.’
    • ‘Fearing a repeat of the terrorist hijackings, the American airline industry was on high alert.’
    • ‘Police said Nichols attempted more hijackings and it was thought he had stolen another vehicle from the same garage.’
    • ‘Lucas added that airlines should move to calm passengers' fears of terrorist hijackings or attacks on aircraft.’
    • ‘The gang has also been linked to assaults on two researchers, a hijacking and two attempted hijackings.’
    • ‘The new security regulations are being introduced to reduce the risk of terrorism and other criminal acts, including hijackings and piracy.’
    • ‘I predict that when the next in this spate of hijackings occurs the gunmen will reckon they have little to lose by fighting to the death.’
    • ‘It threw a spotlight on rumours and warnings of terrorists carrying out ‘dry runs’ for future hijackings.’
    • ‘According to police crime statistics released in September there were 13,793 car hijackings in South Africa in the previous year.’
    • ‘The 1960s to 1980s were the heyday of aircraft hijackings.’
    • ‘It's not like hijackings, where the terrorists are conveniently there to be mobbed.’
    • ‘New security advice was issued, including a warning of an increased risk to aircraft of hijackings.’
    • ‘There could be ‘suicide operations, hijackings, bombings or kidnappings’, the warning added.’
    • ‘By smashing the highly-lucrative market, police aim to slash the number of cars taken in burglaries and hijackings throughout the district.’
    • ‘Police are also investigating the gang's possible links to three hijackings and another murder, all in Mdantsane.’
    • ‘I also knew that the area where my aunt lives is prone to attempted burglaries and hijackings.’
    kidnapping, kidnap, abduction, hostage-taking
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

hijacking

/ˈhʌɪdʒakɪŋ/