Definition of hijack in English:

hijack

(also highjack)

verb

[with object]
  • 1Unlawfully seize (an aircraft, ship, or vehicle) in transit and force it to go to a different destination or use it for one's own purposes.

    ‘a man armed with grenades hijacked the jet yesterday’
    • ‘Police today revealed a lorry hijacked by a gang of armed robbers has been found with its £1million load of electrical equipment still intact.’
    • ‘There, using a mock Boeing aircraft, he claimed he was taught how to smuggle guns onto aircraft and how to hijack an aircraft.’
    • ‘In court, Huckerby, of Clifton Road, was said to have taken a £1,000 bribe to let the gang hijack his vehicle.’
    • ‘They hijacked vehicles, even UN convoys, and staged kidnappings for ransom.’
    • ‘A dangerous armed thief, who hijacked a car in Egham, and committed a further six offences, has been jailed for six-and-a-half-years.’
    • ‘In the end, they hijacked commercial aircrafts without detection or interdiction.’
    • ‘It took us three days by bullock cart to reach Delhi and there was no point in hijacking that vehicle.’
    • ‘In a separate incident in the tribal areas yesterday, gunmen hijacked an official van and took hostage its two occupants.’
    • ‘She remembered the war, which was thrust upon her father, King Dahir, just because some pirates had hijacked a ship belonging to the Caliph.’
    • ‘So I hijacked the ship of the guy who kidnapped me.’
    • ‘A 29-year-old Italian former policeman was arrested yesterday after attempting to hijack an aircraft for the second time in three years.’
    • ‘I've hijacked your car and forced you to drive me to Florida.’
    • ‘You can snatch weapons from your enemies' hands and hijack their all-new vehicles.’
    • ‘It involves chasing and seizing a supposedly hijacked ship and rescuing its crew members.’
    • ‘The Consortium is attempting to label you as a deranged rogue who hijacked an armed ship.’
    • ‘The crew decides to return to Earth to face charges from Starfleet Command related to hijacking their own ship.’
    • ‘Why go to all the trouble of hijacking the ship and then leave the cargo at the warehouse?’
    • ‘This is a threat greater than hijacking or suicide hijacking an aircraft.’
    • ‘Armed men hijack the vehicle when Dr. Quest is away, taking Race and Jonny to an underwater base.’
    • ‘Their Subaru car was hijacked by the armed gang while returning to Charleroi last Friday prior to the start of the Bianchi Rally in Belgium.’
    commandeer, seize, take over, take possession of, skyjack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Steal (goods) by seizing them in transit.
      ‘the UN convoys have been tamely allowing gunmen to hijack relief supplies’
      • ‘Last year he helped expose a bug that was allowing hackers to hijack AOL Instant Messenger accounts.’
      • ‘There's never a good time to hijack the Constitution for political reasons.’
      • ‘Brian Caton of the Prison Officers' Association said racist organisations should not be allowed to hijack the St George emblem.’
      • ‘I even considered hijacking a couple of prints and jamming some waterfalls and sunsets in there to give myself a shot at the prize.’
      • ‘We hijacked the best seats in the house, the front row of the balcony, where I waved my multicolored boa and mauve lace covered hand at him.’
      • ‘I guess I should also apologise to Nick D' Angelo for hijacking the Beats Per Minute show in 1989.’
      • ‘To that end, he hijacks a tricycle laden with sweet treats and accidentally crashes the fast-moving contraption into the Magic Roundabout.’
      • ‘Whitelists won't catch spammers who have hijacked good known addresses, but will catch spammers who haven't.’
      • ‘A bug in Movable Type allows spammers to hijack the ‘Mail This Entry’ blog feature.’
      • ‘Icann has a new policy about domain name transfers which will make hijacking domains much easier.’
      • ‘In the latest example, Tony had to step in and place Paulie Walnuts in charge of a cigarette hijacking operation that Christopher apparently botched.’
    2. 1.2 Take over (something) and use it for a different purpose.
      ‘he argues that pressure groups have hijacked the environmental debate’
      • ‘If the WTO is to be a democratic institution, it must not allow its green room to be hijacked by a few.’
      • ‘Sun Green cleverly hijacks the media with her own message to become a leader of a new youth movement.’
      • ‘It also helps to prevent the discussion being hijacked suddenly by a questioner in a totally different direction.’
      • ‘The public power belongs to everyone and when majorities hijack it for sectarian purposes they act oppressively.’
      • ‘‘Looks-wise, you're perfect,’ Craigy-boy said, hijacking an interview with the Mirror and using it as an open address to the actress.’
      • ‘He has grasped the fact that it is absurd for conservatives to have allowed issues of conservationism to be hijacked by the left.’
      • ‘Here a place with hardly a history hijacks a past.’
      • ‘Mr. Kanthan does not want to discuss the script lest somebody hijacks it and makes the movie.’
      • ‘Tonight's quote is from the California Congressman who accused the Ninth Circuit Court of hijacking the electoral process.’
      • ‘Where Pringle is even-handed in showing how extremists have hijacked the debate over GM food, Nestle is an unapologetic partisan.’
      • ‘He completely hijacks the conversation with streams of consciousness, which are very amusing but very self-protective.’
      • ‘We should not let racist organisations hijack our national flag.’
      • ‘He has been slowly hijacking the machinery of government and developing parallel non-democratic governance structures.’
      • ‘Rational voices are drowned out and extremists are all too willing to hijack the debate.’
      • ‘The word ‘filibuster’ comes from the Spanish word for ‘pirate,’ and that is exactly what the filibuster does; it hijacks the democratic process.’
      • ‘It hijacks the universalism of justice to serve partisan ideological ends.’

noun

  • An incident or act of hijacking.

    as modifier ‘an unsuccessful hijack attempt’
    • ‘Singh pledged that India's fight against terrorism would continue and the hijack would be ‘retributed and justice sought’.’
    • ‘The Saudi statement gave no motive for the hijack attempt.’
    • ‘The control tower notifies several air traffic control centres that a hijack is taking place.’
    • ‘He immediately cancelled his Siberian vacation upon hearing news of the hijack, and set to deal with the incident.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, just watching the address bar on your Internet browser won't inform you of any hijacks.’
    • ‘After the hijack attempt, he says he took stock, realising that ‘life might end any minute and I really need to push things on a bit’.’
    • ‘In a loud voice, tell him that this is a hijack and that you are abducting him.’
    • ‘At least in the commentary box it is, and it is so blatant that ‘conspiracy’ is the wrong word - it is a heist and a hijack.’
    • ‘So they went underground, formed the Red Army Faction, and carried out bank raids, kidnappings, hijacks and bombings.’
    • ‘They abandoned the wedding party and responded to the hijack call, and arrested two suspects.’
    • ‘André Steyn owes his current wellbeing to his mobile phone after the selfless device took a bullet for the merchant during an attempted hijack.’
    • ‘Tokcan was arrested after the hijack, but escaped from jail the following year.’
    • ‘The use of handheld cameras, natural lighting and sharp editing creates the feeling of, ‘actually being in the hijack as it's happening.’’
    • ‘The three run some of the biggest hijacks and burglaries New York has ever seen.’
    • ‘Once the unfortunate Afghans forced the skipper of the Tampa to sail to a port not of his choosing, it became a maritime hijack, analogous to a plane hijack.’
    • ‘Others may perform what's known as a browser hijack.’
    seizure, seizing, taking, taking over, taking away, appropriation, appropriating, commandeering, expropriation, expropriating, confiscation, confiscating, requisition, requisitioning, hijack, hijacking, wresting, usurping, pre-empting, arrogation, claiming
    View synonyms

Origin

1920s (originally US): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

hijack

/ˈhʌɪdʒak/