Definition of high-speed in English:

high-speed

adjective

  • 1Moving, operating, or happening very quickly.

    ‘high-speed travel’
    • ‘The first stage of a multi-billion pound high-speed rail network which will run close to York has been given the go-ahead, according to reports at the weekend.’
    • ‘According to some predictions, every household, school and library will have high-speed broadband access to the Internet by the end of this year.’
    • ‘Main-line drivers operate high-speed trains on longer journeys and shifts include nights away from home while freight drivers are required to do more night work.’
    • ‘The high-speed catamaran was not able to operate a reliable timetable.’
    • ‘It's not a high-speed circuit, there are not many fast corners.’
    • ‘Even though these video clips are short, you'll still want a high-speed connection to enjoy them.’
    • ‘In Europe and Japan, commuters zoom between city centers on efficient high-speed trains.’
    • ‘The waters of the Adriatic were rough and made the high-speed ferry list back and forth dangerously.’
    • ‘That service was sidelined in April when a safety inspection turned up cracks on the brake rotors of all 20 high-speed trains.’
    • ‘Mr Jowett's cycling career was never the same after he was injured in a high-speed crash in the Lake District in 1977 but he continued riding his bike until two years ago.’
    • ‘The money will pay for a fleet of new high-speed trains as well as an upgrade for all 30 stations on the route, and is expected to create about 200 jobs.’
    • ‘Five high-speed cameras placed around the court follow every ball in flight.’
    • ‘Most observers would expect him to travel in the latest military high-speed aircraft.’
    • ‘The service works with dial-up and high-speed Internet services.’
    • ‘The 140 mph trains will run fast commuter services from London to Ashford on the new high-speed rail link to the Channel tunnel.’
    • ‘Amtrak has said it is losing $1 million every week the high-speed service is not operational.’
    • ‘Studies show that European subscriptions to high-speed Internet service are on track to surpass those in the United States.’
    • ‘But many viewers will choose to download overnight and with the increasing availability of high-speed broadband, the time could be reduced to an hour.’
    • ‘Just two or three years ago, hotels that offered guests in-room high-speed Internet access were still somewhat of a novelty.’
    • ‘The Shinkansen was part of a fleet of high-speed trains which experts say represented one of the biggest advances in railway technology.’
    fast, fast-moving, quick, rapid, speedy, swift, breakneck, lightning, whistle-stop, brisk, prompt, expeditious
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of photographic film) needing little light or only short exposure.
      • ‘So the only option that you have is to go for high-speed film.’
      • ‘At that time high-speed film didn't exist, but the cameraman, Lorne Batchelor, was really very good.’
    2. 1.2 (of steel) suitable for drill bits and other tools that cut so fast that they become red-hot.
      • ‘Cobalt is used in high-speed steels and increases the red hardness so that they can be used at higher operating temperatures.’
      • ‘At the low end you have blades made from high-speed steel with only around 10 to 12 teeth.’
      • ‘Tool materials may be high-speed steel, cast alloy, or tungsten carbide.’

Pronunciation

high-speed

/ˌhʌɪˈspiːd/