Main definitions of hiding in English

: hiding1hiding2

hiding1

noun

informal
  • 1A physical beating.

    ‘they caught him and gave him a hiding’
    • ‘The prosecutor said Foster, who was arrested in a pub, later told the police he was terrified he was going to get a hiding, having been told to get out of the car.’
    • ‘I told Dorothy I would get a hiding for being so late but Dorothy said she would talk to my parents.’
    • ‘The justice replied that he was satisfied that it was not the father's fault that the boys had done what they did. He gave them a good hiding and it was no less than what they deserved.’
    • ‘I was always chicken when it came to getting hidings from my father.’
    • ‘I don't drink because I see a lot of people, they get hidings from their husbands.’
    • ‘She told her to put the ‘damn phone’ away and said if she were her daughter she would have given her a good hiding.’
    • ‘But a violent hiding, indulged in by parents who lash out at their children to cover up their own failings, only causes bitter resentment.’
    • ‘The minute offenders are apprehended, they are ushered to a quiet spot behind the bushes and will be on the receiving end of such a hiding that they are not likely to re-offend.’
    • ‘In 1956, it was called getting a thrashing, or a hiding - or just ‘getting it’.’
    • ‘Mr Smith then heard them threaten: ‘We'll get you out, give you a good hiding and then put you back there for the night’.’
    beating, battering, thrashing, thumping, pounding, pummelling, drubbing, slapping, smacking, spanking, hammering, cuffing, thwacking, mauling, pelting
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A severe defeat.
      ‘if they'd played badly they might have expected a hiding’
      • ‘Alert readers may have noticed that the England cricket team has been on the wrong end of several hidings in recent years, and indeed have sunk to the level that they are now regarded as the weakest of the ‘top’ cricket nations.’
      • ‘It will be a case of reality-time on Saturday when the Redmen from Grafton travel to Lismore to take a likely hiding from the Greens.’
      • ‘Everyone agrees Northern Ireland are facing a hiding from England.’
      • ‘We stand to get a hiding, but it ought to be exciting anyway.’
      • ‘Scotland suffered a humiliating hiding in this international friendly at Hampden Park today.’
      • ‘Last year, after the hiding from Cork, we got a bit of pride back the way the lads played against Galway in the Park, they went down fighting.’
      • ‘As with any team facing an Old Firm member in the Scottish Cup final, the script reads that you turn up, do your best, but prepare for a hiding and the consolation of a loser's medal.’
      • ‘At 20-3 down they were looking at a real hiding, but they found some passion.’
      • ‘Enrico Chiesa completed the 8-1 hiding with a penalty.’
      • ‘As if that was not bad enough, Murphy then gave away a second penalty - earning himself a red card as well - to leave Shrimps looking at a hiding.’
      • ‘Replacement keeper Matt Sargeant was brought on and striker Joel Rogers sacrificed, but that did not stop Epsom from being on the wrong end of a real hiding.’
      • ‘It's all very well to talk about promoting the sport but try telling that to the Namibian players this week or whoever else have been on the end of a real hiding those past few weeks.’
      • ‘A couple of good points from Therese Keenan sealed the issue and St. Laurences were suddenly on the wrong end of a ten-point hiding.’
      • ‘Meanwhile St. Peter's were receiving a hiding from a surprisingly slick Pembroke side, whose Ball, ending only hours before, had no doubt taken its toll.’
      • ‘It's the right way to go and while a few hidings may be endured along the way, young players will by finding their feet at inter-county level.’
      • ‘A few results offered false hope - a victory on Boxing Day away to Motherwell, Livingston taking a hiding at Perth.’
      • ‘Even though Newcastle were on the wrong end of a hiding against Leicester last weekend, May repaid Andrew's faith by setting up Newcastle's two tries.’
      • ‘Ally MacDonald's own goal in nine minutes then set Skye up for what might have been a real hiding, especially when Alan MacLeod was sent off in 35 minutes.’
      • ‘In the second half, only a superb display by Paul Green in the Builders' goal separated them from a real hiding as they suffered a hangover from their midweek cup semi-final win.’
      • ‘Whatever the excuses - and however valid they might be - the league leaders were given a right hiding by the Lanarkshire newcomers.’

Phrases

  • be on a hiding to nothing

    • Be unlikely to succeed, or be unlikely to gain much advantage if one does.

      ‘politically we are on a hiding to nothing in the long run’
      • ‘With neither side willing to concede ground, the UN secretary-general was on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘We looked on a hiding to nothing here, considering our away record and the fact that City had signed a new player.’
      • ‘But they know they're on a hiding to nothing if they raise a murmur of objection.’
      • ‘A captain in any sport, says Brearley, is on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘You have to do what a client wants, you know, even if you are on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘For example if you want to lose weight because your partner says you need to then, I'm sorry, but you are on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘I'll be a young granny, but if my kids have kids in their 20s and think I'm going to look after them full-time, they're on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘But he and his legal team must have known they were on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘If they stick to the same tactics they will be on a hiding to nothing.’
      • ‘He's on a hiding to nothing because he's not Scottish and he's certainly taking a hell of a lot of flak for us players.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from hide + -ing.

Pronunciation

hiding

/ˈhʌɪdɪŋ/

Main definitions of hiding in English

: hiding1hiding2

hiding2

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action of concealing someone or something.

    • ‘Being ‘patriotic’ in carrying out journalism may lead to self-censorship, and even the hiding of facts.’
    • ‘I could understand the hiding of certain military secrets.’
    • ‘We go through the decorating of the Easter eggs and the hiding of the Easter eggs and the realization a week later that the smell coming from under the radiator is the egg that got away.’
    • ‘The house we lived in was brilliant for hiding: lots of dark corners, low shelves, heavy curtains and piles of coats or dressing up clothes stacked in a big old chest.’
    • ‘But of course a lot was being hidden, whoever was doing the hiding.’
    • ‘You know, this life of hiding and lying is no fun.’
    1. 1.1 The state of being hidden.
      ‘the shipowner had gone into hiding’
      • ‘The couple then went into hiding in Sheffield, first at a bed and breakfast and then at Foxhill Road for a couple of months.’
      • ‘The curtains on her bungalow home remained closed yesterday afternoon and locals said she may have gone into hiding to escape the media frenzy.’
      • ‘No one knows whether Defoe fought at this battle, but he certainly was forced into hiding afterwards and was lucky not to be caught and hanged.’
      • ‘Felipe had wanted to go into hiding after the threat, but Carmen had persuaded him that the family should stay together.’
      • ‘Rogers then discharged himself and went into hiding.’
      • ‘The members of the group fled and went into hiding.’
      • ‘In January 2003, the BBC interviewed her; at that time, she had come out of hiding but was attended by bodyguards.’
      • ‘They say that African women in particular are desperate for asylum because of domestic violence in their home countries and that many have to go into hiding when they are deported.’
      • ‘Kerensky narrowly escaped this defeat, and for the next few weeks he lived in hiding until he could leave the country, eventually arriving in France.’
      • ‘His five years in hiding also raise many questions.’
      • ‘They went to a hospital under police guard, then into hiding.’
      • ‘A woman has gone into hiding after the businessman husband who tried to kill her was freed on bail, eight months into a 12-year jail term.’
      • ‘He added that he had gone into hiding for fear of his life.’
      • ‘Surviving the trauma, she goes into hiding with her mother in a more remote village.’
      • ‘During the weeks of terror that followed, two of the revolutionary leaders, Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht, went into hiding in Berlin.’
      • ‘A computer programmer from Wigan has gone into hiding after winning the jackpot on TV's Who Wants to be A Millionaire?’
      • ‘Many opposition supporters have fled into hiding.’
      • ‘When he eventually emerged from hiding, the controversial centre-forward dismissed the incident as a prank, and blamed the press for blowing matters out of proportion.’
      • ‘Mr Chen remains in hiding after claiming there are a thousand agents for China operating in Australia and that people have been kidnapped and transported back to Beijing.’
      • ‘Bepe's alleged assailant has since gone into hiding, but police said they knew who they were looking for and expected to make an arrest soon.’
      hidden, concealed, lying low, gone to ground, gone to earth, gone underground, in a safe house
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from hide + -ing.

Pronunciation

hiding

/ˈhʌɪdɪŋ/