Definition of Hidatsa in English:

Hidatsa

noun

  • 1A member of an American Indian people living on the upper Missouri River.

    • ‘He met the Crows in June 1805 at the Knife River villages of the Mandans and Hidatsas on the upper Missouri.’
    • ‘In Bodmer's painting Pehriska Ruhpa, an eminent Hidatsa, is shown wearing a large headdress with a medial fan of turkey tail feathers (a probable war symbol) and an upright red plume.’
    • ‘The Hidatsa even kept a two-year supply of seed corn.’
    • ‘Extended stays at Fort McKenzie and Fort Union and a five-month visit among the Mandans and Hidatsas afforded an unprecedented opportunity to document the people, traditions, and history of the upper Missouri region.’
    • ‘Five years prior to the corps' arrival, the Hidatsas had captured Sacagawea from the Shoshones near the Three Forks.’
  • 2[mass noun] The Siouan language of the Hidatsa, now almost extinct.

    • ‘Hidatsa, like many languages, is on the verge of vanishing and taking with it crucial linguistic and cultural data.’

adjective

  • Relating to the Hidatsa or their language.

    • ‘From the Hidatsa towns, Larocque traveled with his hosts southwest to the Powder River, then up what is today Clear Creek to the base of the Bighorns.’
    • ‘Described as ‘the central marketplace of the Northern Plains,’ the five Mandan and Hidatsa villages attracted many Europeans and Indians alike.’
    • ‘In Hidatsa households, men with many ‘children’ were materially better off than those with few or no ‘children,’ and assimilation of war captives into various clans was rapid.’
    • ‘Mackay and Evans were the unlikely duo hired by the Spanish government to expel British traders from the Maridan and Hidatsa villages at the confluence of the Knife and Missouri Rivers.’
    • ‘On the northern Plains are found the Crow, Hidatsa, and Dakota (also known as Sioux) languages.’

Origin

From Hidatsa hiratsa willow wood lodge.

Pronunciation:

Hidatsa

/hɪˈdatsə/