Definition of heresy in English:

heresy

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Belief or opinion contrary to orthodox religious (especially Christian) doctrine:

    ‘Huss was burned for heresy’
    [count noun] ‘the doctrine was denounced as a heresy by the Pope’
    • ‘Suppression of the movement in Bulgaria intensified after a 1211 synod condemned the heresy.’
    • ‘Augustine spent more than thirty years combating heresy, writing commentaries and interpretations of Christian theology.’
    • ‘Galileo was charged with heresy by the Christian church for having the temerity to suggest that the earth went round the sun.’
    • ‘Sutcliffe makes no suggestion identifying New Age phenomena with Gnosticism, one of the classic heresies of the Christian church.’
    • ‘Most religious cults do teach what the Christian church would declare to be heresy but some do not.’
    • ‘We believe that Christian Zionism is a Christian heresy - it is really misinterpreting the Bible.’
    • ‘In March 1638, after a heresy trial, the clergy excommunicated her.’
    • ‘To our historicist age, Hildegard's Christian Platonism may seem the ultimate heresy.’
    • ‘The film comes close to reviving the old Monophysite heresy - as if Jesus is totally divine in nature.’
    • ‘Christological heresies result when one story cancels the other.’
    • ‘It is also true, as Colin Gunton makes clear in his essay, that Arianism is a perennial Christian heresy.’
    • ‘The church was split by heresies concerning the person of Christ, while Mariolatry was practised to such an extent that even today many Muslims think the Christian Trinity comprises Father, Son and Mary.’
    • ‘The creeds address incorrect beliefs or heresies of the times in which they were created.’
    • ‘Once you were baptized into the Church, you were a Christian forever, unless you commit heresy.’
    • ‘Arguably, the avoidance of passive secularism led to my own eventual entanglement and heresy trials.’
    • ‘There is neither harsh injustice nor unprincipled love nor Christological heresy in that; there is only unfathomable mercy.’
    • ‘The existence of actual witchcraft required the taint of Christian heresy.’
    • ‘The Church must be watchful lest false teachers worm their way into the fellowship and spread damnable heresies.’
    • ‘That rejection soon led to the Monophysite heresy, which lives on to this day in the Coptic and Ethiopian churches.’
    • ‘The trials of Jesus echoed the criminal procedures of English heresy trials.’
    dissension, dissent, dissidence, blasphemy, nonconformity, unorthodoxy, heterodoxy, apostasy, freethinking, schism, faction
    scepticism, agnosticism, atheism, non-theism, non-belief, unbelief, idolatry, paganism, separatism, sectarianism, revisionism
    tergiversation, recreancy, recusancy
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Opinion profoundly at odds with what is generally accepted:
      ‘the heresy of being uncommitted to the right political dogma’
      • ‘Even if this isn't heresy, it's bad news for women's claims for equality.’
      • ‘To say, in our culture, that I have a good rhythm and balance in my life with work and activities is almost heresy.’
      • ‘In 2000 it was considered economic heresy to contemplate a breach of the stability pact.’
      • ‘Indeed, they are so against the conventional wisdom that they might be termed heresy.’
      • ‘But why does it have to be political heresy to go the whole hog?’
      • ‘Hacking out at the Old Course is the ultimate heresy.’
      • ‘That we can still think of wringing out a song from all this is worse than heresy, blasphemy, sacrilege.’
      • ‘Some of you have noticed that I've just committed heresy and contradicted doctrine.’
      • ‘The hounding out of heresy, whether religious or political, is always a symptom of instability in the state.’
      • ‘To say that the value of gold was an exception would be considered heresy by him.’
      • ‘I know that's heresy, but there is a treacly quality to so much of the talk about King and his dream that it is like an overdose of candy.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French heresie, based on Latin haeresis, from Greek hairesis choice (in ecclesiastical Greek heretical sect), from haireomai choose.

Pronunciation:

heresy

/ˈhɛrɪsi/