Definition of her in English:

her

pronoun

  • 1third person singular Used as the object of a verb or preposition to refer to a female person or animal previously mentioned or easily identified.

    ‘she knew I hated her’
    ‘I told Hannah I would wait for her’
    • ‘She denied any further and more serious impropriety when it was easily open for her to do so.’
    • ‘The animal promptly followed her into the road and a car had to brake suddenly to avoid it.’
    • ‘It made her the youngest female solo artist to debut at number one in the British charts.’
    • ‘We don't hate Roxie for her ambition, merely pity her for the hard lessons that she is forced to learn.’
    • ‘He could just as easily write the letters to her if the issue was one of communication.’
    • ‘The memory of the boys reminded him he could not keep his identity from her for long.’
    • ‘He may well also have mentioned smoking to her but this did not make any particular impression.’
    • ‘No one had mentioned to her that the boy had been badly burned and was in great pain.’
    • ‘We decided at this time not to mention anything to her about possible cancer.’
    • ‘In bed, he shrugs off her goodnight kiss and lies there waiting for her to ask him what's wrong.’
    • ‘I did not see her as one to wait tables at a restaurant or tend to customers in retail.’
    • ‘Perhaps you might entice a friend to some along with you and mention this to him or her.’
    • ‘Does this mean that he will know Judy to be Judy when he correctly identifies her?’
    • ‘Tina would bike to her mother's work at the end of the day and wait for her to finish.’
    • ‘She is waiting for the Indian embassy to issue her a new passport so that she can fly back home.’
    • ‘As an adult she's learnt to say no to herself, but it hasn't come easily to her.’
    • ‘So, all I had to do was look out for the lady who picked up her phone to identify her.’
    • ‘Perhaps he went on and on to her about a previous girlfriend and she decided enough was enough!’
    • ‘Megan is coming for a visit at the weekend so I will mention it to her to have a look at the provisions.’
    1. 1.1 Referring to a ship, country, or other inanimate thing regarded as female.
      ‘the crew tried to sail her through a narrow gap’
      • ‘It was another bad week for the insurance world and all who sail in her in Scotland.’
      • ‘It must be a navy big enough to defend her against the combined efforts of Russia and France.’
      • ‘The American ship put up such resistance that Stier, after sinking her, went down too.’
      • ‘So, as usual we wish good speed to The Highfield Mole and all who sail in her.’
      • ‘During the night the Leda was torpedoed and, regrettably, no ship was sent to assist her.’
      • ‘A large helm is still in place on the aft deck, giving her the appearance of a much older ship.’
      • ‘A few of our group made a night dive on her for lobsters but I decided to wait and dive her at dawn.’
    2. 1.2 Used after the verb ‘to be’ and after ‘than’ or ‘as’
      ‘it must be her’
      See her
      ‘he was younger than her’
      • ‘But she needn't think I'm not as good as her for all that!’
      • ‘I know I can sing better than a screaming psychopath with messed up hair - OK, I didn't mean to be that harsh, but I know I can sing better than her.’
      • ‘‘We don't know it's her,’ muttered Ross sulkily.’
      • ‘I know it's her, because she has one shoe heel missing and you can hear it when she walks.’
      • ‘If I train really hard can I be as fast as her next year?’
    3. 1.3West Indian She.
      ‘she will get all her wants’
  • 2North American dialect, archaic third person singular Herself.

    ‘peevishly she flung her on her face’

possessive determiner

  • 1Belonging to or associated with a female person or animal previously mentioned or easily identified.

    ‘Patricia loved her job’
    • ‘The only regret she mentions is that her father is not around to receive a signed copy.’
    • ‘On Friday police said they would not identify her until her next of kin had been informed.’
    • ‘She has asked not to be identified but is in her nineties and lives in East Yorkshire.’
    • ‘The girl's mother had to listen to the tape to identify the voice of her daughter.’
    • ‘Thank God that her love of meat flavoured treats is greater than her love of chasing chucks.’
    • ‘She also loved animals but her joy was always in her garden as she loved flowers and plants.’
    • ‘He says that he found her in Israel, and he identifies her and publishes her photograph in the book.’
    • ‘They mentioned mechanical problems with her car and included details about friends.’
    • ‘If it is not properly controlled, it can lead to problems for the mother or her baby.’
    • ‘She loved her own company, loved her animals and would do anything for anybody.’
    • ‘Until a few years ago my own sister was a primary school teacher who loved her job.’
    • ‘Her mother still holds down her job and has taken up t'ai chi to get involved in sporty things again.’
    • ‘The person seeking deliverance must exercise his or her will in such circumstances.’
    • ‘Be it intentional or not, it should also be noted that her name is rarely mentioned.’
    • ‘By expressing a love for pink, a girl is affirming her identity as a female creature.’
    • ‘She can never walk into York without being stopped by one of her mothers or babies now grown up.’
    • ‘Antenatal care aims to monitor and promote the wellbeing of a mother and her developing baby.’
    • ‘She was as large and powerful as the animal from which her blanket was made.’
    • ‘She also mentions her own personal reaction to the resignation, which is worth quoting.’
    • ‘Let us just deal with some of the things that Helen Clark forgot to mention in her speech.’
    1. 1.1 Belonging to or associated with a ship, country, or other inanimate thing regarded as female.
      ‘at her launch, she was the ultimate in luxury transatlantic travel’
      • ‘On the second tow, Rasa had a good launch but her canopy was slightly off to the left.’
      • ‘The Island-class vessel has won the Jersey Cup, awarded every year to a ship of her type.’
      • ‘Captain Lowe immediately put his ship about, felt her come free and then headed out to sea.’
      • ‘A ship at my side spreads her white sails to the morning breeze and starts for the blue ocean.’
      • ‘Usually lunch is back on board as the ship makes her stately progress to the next port.’
      • ‘It shows the ship lying forlornly on her starboard side, almost completely capsized.’
  • 2Used in titles.

    ‘Her Majesty’
    • ‘I am deeply sorry for this news that Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret is dead.’
    • ‘To suggest that it was an alternative to the Queen's Christmas message is frankly insulting to Her Majesty.’
    • ‘It was the mid eighties, and how could I possibly fail to have a haircut called after Her Royal Loveliness?’
    • ‘Imagine having to stoop to that level - particularly after being ignored by Her Majesty for years.’
    • ‘I have spent two nights as a guest of Her Majesty, and eaten some truly terrible food.’
    • ‘In 1957, I was back in Jamaica serving Her Majesty as a conscript in her armed forces there.’
    • ‘The genuine warmth and affection in which large numbers of the British people hold Her Majesty is clear to see.’
    • ‘Our claim has been made to Her Majesty, the Crown, not the Government of Queensland.’
    • ‘The two were separated as guests lined up to meet Her Majesty and Mary was at the front as she walked by.’
    • ‘After all, with due deference to Her Majesty, it was suddenly beginning to look a little indelicate.’
    • ‘In an act of petty vindictiveness she was deprived of the title of Her Royal Highness.’
    • ‘Sir Paul McCartney told the crowds he had asked Her Majesty if they would all be back for another concert next year.’
    • ‘However I do think that it is time that we were moving on and I also think that is the view of Her Majesty.’
    • ‘Trust chairman Jane Gummer will welcome Her Royal Highness and give her a tour of the charity's boats.’
    • ‘The Kray twins and their brother Charlie eventually ended as guests of Her Majesty in Parkhurst prison.’
    • ‘I'm willing to go along with the idea that maybe it might be nice to welcome Her Majesty to one of her Realms.’
    • ‘First, let me assure you that Her Royal Highness is of sound mind, body and spirit!’
    • ‘If his recent spell as a guest of Her Majesty has not taught the talented youngster a lesson, that thought surely will.’
    • ‘Public bemusement with modern art is shared by Her Majesty, a new book has revealed.’
    • ‘No response was sought by Mr Burrell from the Queen and Her Majesty made no comment.’

Usage

Is it incorrect to say I am older than her (rather than I am older than she) or it's her all right (rather than it's she all right) and, if so, why? For a discussion of this issue, see personal pronoun

Phrases

  • her indoors

    • informal, humorous One's wife.

      ‘Liz said she didn't mind how I introduced her, provided it wasn't as ‘her indoors’’
      • ‘I'm bound to want it but it's justifying it to her indoors that is the difficult bit.’
      • ‘Announce that you are going on holiday or on an even longer break without him or her indoors and you may as well be signing your divorce papers.’
      • ‘It would be a brilliant way of getting away from her indoors.’
      • ‘Anyway, back from the pub and out for a quick meal with her indoors and that concludes the heady celebrations.’
      • ‘Needing a quick drink after our shocking experience, we repaired to Garavan's and discoursed sapiently before the Merc had to get home to her indoors with the rolling pin.’
      girlfriend, girl, sweetheart, partner, significant other, inamorata, fiancée
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English hire, genitive and dative of hīo, hēo ‘she’.

Pronunciation

her

/həː/