Main definitions of hebe in English

: Hebe1Hebe2

Hebe1

proper noun

  • 1Greek Mythology
    The daughter of Hera and Zeus, and cup-bearer of the gods.

  • 2Astronomy
    Asteroid 6, discovered in 1847 (diameter 192 km).

Origin

From Greek hēbē youth, youthful beauty.

Pronunciation:

Hebe

/ˈhiːbi/

Main definitions of hebe in English

: Hebe1Hebe2

Hebe2

noun

US
informal, offensive
  • A Jewish person.

Origin

Early 20th century: abbreviation of Hebrew.

Pronunciation:

Hebe

/hiːb/

Main definitions of hebe in English

: Hebe1Hebe2

hebe

noun

  • An evergreen flowering shrub with spikes of mauve, pink, or white flowers, native to New Zealand and widely grown as an ornamental.

    • ‘Some hebes on this track are a rare variety, found only on the Port Hills.’
    • ‘Roses, honeysuckle and clematis run vigorously together up the pergola, beneath which are hebes, more hostas, hardy geraniums and several magnificent phormiums.’
    • ‘I want some autonomy in the hedge department, and hebes are tough enough to survive on the seafront here, or so I was advised by the darling man with the heavenly garden around the corner.’
    • ‘The six tapestries she planted come alive with interwoven threads of color and texture from golden boxleaf honeysuckle, lavender, hebe, leatherleaf sedge, and Bowles' golden sedge bordered by dwarf boxwood.’
    • ‘Over three months, the gardeners pulled out the weeds by hand, dug and prepared the ground, and replanted with flowering evergreen shrubs such as hebes and mahonia, for year-round colour and low maintenance.’
    • ‘The eclectic garden uses Mexican pebbles as a ground-cover and is punctuated with yellow-blooming kangaroo paws and purple-flowered hebes.’
    • ‘A hebe would also be suitable and there are thousands to choose from; they are not so happy to be pruned, so you would have to choose a small variety.’
    • ‘Against the terracotta house walls, lined with white hebe hedges ‘that look absolutely fabulous in late summer’, are places left for plinths.’
    • ‘We found the netting, and added a cluster of potted hebes and one further laurel to our plant collection, along with three huge plastic sacks of compost and mulch.’
    • ‘They were free bits of hebe from public land, grown in free sand from the river, and some old pots that I no doubt scored from somewhere.’

Origin

Modern Latin, named after the goddess Hebe(see Hebe).

Pronunciation:

hebe

/ˈhiːbi/